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Noninvasive acoustic cell trapping in a microfluidic perfusion system for online bioassays

Evander, Mikael LU ; Johansson, Linda; Lilliehorn, Tobias; Piskur, Jure LU ; Lindvall, Magnus LU ; Johansson, Stefan; Almqvist, Monica LU ; Laurell, Thomas LU and Nilsson, Johan LU (2007) In Analytical Chemistry 79(7). p.2984-2991
Abstract
Techniques for manipulating, separating, and trapping particles and cells are highly desired in today's bioanalytical and biomedical field. The microfluidic chip-based acoustic noncontact trapping method earlier developed within the group now provides a flexible platform for performing cell- and particle-based assays in continuous flow microsystems. An acoustic standing wave is generated in etched glass channels (600 x 61 mu m(2)) by miniature ultrasonic transducers (550 x 550 x 200 mu m(3)). Particles or cells passing the transducer will be retained and levitated in the center of the channel without any contact with the channel walls. The maximum trapping force was calculated to be 430 +/- 135 pN by measuring the drag force exerted on a... (More)
Techniques for manipulating, separating, and trapping particles and cells are highly desired in today's bioanalytical and biomedical field. The microfluidic chip-based acoustic noncontact trapping method earlier developed within the group now provides a flexible platform for performing cell- and particle-based assays in continuous flow microsystems. An acoustic standing wave is generated in etched glass channels (600 x 61 mu m(2)) by miniature ultrasonic transducers (550 x 550 x 200 mu m(3)). Particles or cells passing the transducer will be retained and levitated in the center of the channel without any contact with the channel walls. The maximum trapping force was calculated to be 430 +/- 135 pN by measuring the drag force exerted on a single particle levitated in the standing wave. The temperature increase in the channel was characterized by fluorescence measurements using rhodamine B, and levels of moderate temperature increase were noted. Neural stem cells were acoustically trapped and shown to be viable after 15 min. Further evidence of the mild cell handling conditions was demonstrated as yeast cells were successfully cultured for 6 h in the acoustic trap while being perfused by the cell medium at a flowrate of 1 mu L/min. The acoustic microchip method facilitates trapping of single cells as well as larger cell clusters. The noncontact mode of cell handling is especially important when studies on nonadherent cells are performed, e.g., stem cells, yeast cells, or blood cells, as mechanical stress and surface interaction are minimized. The demonstrated acoustic trapping of cells and particles enables cell- or particle-based bioassays to be performed in a continuous flow format. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Analytical Chemistry
volume
79
issue
7
pages
2984 - 2991
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000245304300047
  • scopus:34247119705
ISSN
1520-6882
DOI
10.1021/ac061576v
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3173bfe0-4d04-4eed-bf47-aff612f2edfd (old id 670324)
date added to LUP
2007-12-11 20:26:23
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:46:17
@article{3173bfe0-4d04-4eed-bf47-aff612f2edfd,
  abstract     = {Techniques for manipulating, separating, and trapping particles and cells are highly desired in today's bioanalytical and biomedical field. The microfluidic chip-based acoustic noncontact trapping method earlier developed within the group now provides a flexible platform for performing cell- and particle-based assays in continuous flow microsystems. An acoustic standing wave is generated in etched glass channels (600 x 61 mu m(2)) by miniature ultrasonic transducers (550 x 550 x 200 mu m(3)). Particles or cells passing the transducer will be retained and levitated in the center of the channel without any contact with the channel walls. The maximum trapping force was calculated to be 430 +/- 135 pN by measuring the drag force exerted on a single particle levitated in the standing wave. The temperature increase in the channel was characterized by fluorescence measurements using rhodamine B, and levels of moderate temperature increase were noted. Neural stem cells were acoustically trapped and shown to be viable after 15 min. Further evidence of the mild cell handling conditions was demonstrated as yeast cells were successfully cultured for 6 h in the acoustic trap while being perfused by the cell medium at a flowrate of 1 mu L/min. The acoustic microchip method facilitates trapping of single cells as well as larger cell clusters. The noncontact mode of cell handling is especially important when studies on nonadherent cells are performed, e.g., stem cells, yeast cells, or blood cells, as mechanical stress and surface interaction are minimized. The demonstrated acoustic trapping of cells and particles enables cell- or particle-based bioassays to be performed in a continuous flow format.},
  author       = {Evander, Mikael and Johansson, Linda and Lilliehorn, Tobias and Piskur, Jure and Lindvall, Magnus and Johansson, Stefan and Almqvist, Monica and Laurell, Thomas and Nilsson, Johan},
  issn         = {1520-6882},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {2984--2991},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {Analytical Chemistry},
  title        = {Noninvasive acoustic cell trapping in a microfluidic perfusion system for online bioassays},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac061576v},
  volume       = {79},
  year         = {2007},
}