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Parental estimation of their child's increased type 1 diabetes risk during the first 2 years of participation in an international observational study : Results from the TEDDY study

Swartling, Ulrica LU ; Lynch, Kristian LU ; Smith, Laura; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett LU and , (2016) In Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics 11(2). p.106-114
Abstract

This study assessed mothers' and fathers' perception of their child's risk of getting type I diabetes (TID) during the first 2 years of their participation in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study. TEDDY parents were informed of their child's increased genetic risk for Tl D at study inception. Parent perception of the child's risk was assessed at 3, 6, 15, and 27 months of age. In families with no history of TID, underestimation of the child's TID risk was common in mothers (>38%) and more so in fathers (>50%). The analyses indicated that parental education, country of residence, family history of TID, household crowding, ethnic minority status, and beliefs that the child's TID risk can be reduced... (More)

This study assessed mothers' and fathers' perception of their child's risk of getting type I diabetes (TID) during the first 2 years of their participation in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study. TEDDY parents were informed of their child's increased genetic risk for Tl D at study inception. Parent perception of the child's risk was assessed at 3, 6, 15, and 27 months of age. In families with no history of TID, underestimation of the child's TID risk was common in mothers (>38%) and more so in fathers (>50%). The analyses indicated that parental education, country of residence, family history of TID, household crowding, ethnic minority status, and beliefs that the child's TID risk can be reduced were factors associated with parental risk perception accuracy. Even when given extensive information about their child's TID risk, parents often fail to accurately grasp the information provided. This is particularly true for fathers, families from low socioeconomic backgrounds, and those with no family history of Tl D. It is important to develop improved tools for risk communication tailored to individual family needs.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Children, Informed consent, Risk perception, Screening, Type i diabetes
in
Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics
volume
11
issue
2
pages
9 pages
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:84983515621
  • wos:000379511300003
ISSN
1556-2646
DOI
10.1177/1556264616648589
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
67303da9-822a-461b-a64e-6f34f31f86f3
alternative location
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4917467/
date added to LUP
2017-02-16 15:01:28
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:33:05
@article{67303da9-822a-461b-a64e-6f34f31f86f3,
  abstract     = {<p>This study assessed mothers' and fathers' perception of their child's risk of getting type I diabetes (TID) during the first 2 years of their participation in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study. TEDDY parents were informed of their child's increased genetic risk for Tl D at study inception. Parent perception of the child's risk was assessed at 3, 6, 15, and 27 months of age. In families with no history of TID, underestimation of the child's TID risk was common in mothers (&gt;38%) and more so in fathers (&gt;50%). The analyses indicated that parental education, country of residence, family history of TID, household crowding, ethnic minority status, and beliefs that the child's TID risk can be reduced were factors associated with parental risk perception accuracy. Even when given extensive information about their child's TID risk, parents often fail to accurately grasp the information provided. This is particularly true for fathers, families from low socioeconomic backgrounds, and those with no family history of Tl D. It is important to develop improved tools for risk communication tailored to individual family needs.</p>},
  author       = {Swartling, Ulrica and Lynch, Kristian and Smith, Laura and Johnson, Suzanne Bennett and , },
  issn         = {1556-2646},
  keyword      = {Children,Informed consent,Risk perception,Screening,Type i diabetes},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {106--114},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics},
  title        = {Parental estimation of their child's increased type 1 diabetes risk during the first 2 years of participation in an international observational study : Results from the TEDDY study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1556264616648589},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2016},
}