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Peripheral bone mineral density and different intensities of physical activity in children 6-8 years old: The Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study

Hasselstrom, H.; Karlsson, Magnus LU ; Hansen, S. E.; Gronfeldt, V.; Froberg, K. and Andersen, L. B. (2007) In Calcified Tissue International 80(1). p.31-38
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the association between objectively measured habitual physical activity and calcaneal and forearm bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)), one mechanically more loaded and one less loaded skeletal region, in children aged 6-8 years. BMD was measured in 297 boys and 265 girls by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the forearm and calcaneus. An accelerometer registered the level of physical activity during 4 days (2 weekdays and the weekend). Weight, height, and skinfold thickness were measured. In order to establish thresholds (count center dot min(-1)) for bone-stimulating physical activity, we evaluated different definitions of vigorous physical activity. The boys had 3.2% higher distal forearm bone... (More)
This study aimed to evaluate the association between objectively measured habitual physical activity and calcaneal and forearm bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)), one mechanically more loaded and one less loaded skeletal region, in children aged 6-8 years. BMD was measured in 297 boys and 265 girls by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the forearm and calcaneus. An accelerometer registered the level of physical activity during 4 days (2 weekdays and the weekend). Weight, height, and skinfold thickness were measured. In order to establish thresholds (count center dot min(-1)) for bone-stimulating physical activity, we evaluated different definitions of vigorous physical activity. The boys had 3.2% higher distal forearm bone mineral content (BMC, P < 0.001) and 4.5% higher distal forearm BMD (P < 0.001) than the girls. They also carried out 9.7% more daily physical activity and spent 14.6-19.0% more time in vigorous physical activity (all P < 0.05) compared to the girls. In contrast, the girls had 3.8% higher calcaneal BMC (P < 0.01) and 2.5% higher calcaneal BMD (P < 0.05) than the boys. Both calcaneal and forearm BMD were significantly related to total time of daily physical activity as well as with intense physical activity above all the chosen cut-off points (all P < 0.05). The beta value for mean count center dot min(-1) physical activity was significantly lower than that for all the chosen cut-off points of vigorous activity both for calcaneal and distal forearm BMD. This study suggests that both habitual daily physical activity and amount of vigorous physical activity in children aged 6-8 years are associated with appendicular BMD. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
bone mineral density, bone mineral content, physical activity
in
Calcified Tissue International
volume
80
issue
1
pages
31 - 38
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000243448700005
  • scopus:33846257268
ISSN
1432-0827
DOI
10.1007/s00223-006-0137-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ca4b1399-fe55-4285-b801-92f2832d4fc1 (old id 677534)
date added to LUP
2007-12-07 16:11:15
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:41:09
@article{ca4b1399-fe55-4285-b801-92f2832d4fc1,
  abstract     = {This study aimed to evaluate the association between objectively measured habitual physical activity and calcaneal and forearm bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)), one mechanically more loaded and one less loaded skeletal region, in children aged 6-8 years. BMD was measured in 297 boys and 265 girls by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the forearm and calcaneus. An accelerometer registered the level of physical activity during 4 days (2 weekdays and the weekend). Weight, height, and skinfold thickness were measured. In order to establish thresholds (count center dot min(-1)) for bone-stimulating physical activity, we evaluated different definitions of vigorous physical activity. The boys had 3.2% higher distal forearm bone mineral content (BMC, P &lt; 0.001) and 4.5% higher distal forearm BMD (P &lt; 0.001) than the girls. They also carried out 9.7% more daily physical activity and spent 14.6-19.0% more time in vigorous physical activity (all P &lt; 0.05) compared to the girls. In contrast, the girls had 3.8% higher calcaneal BMC (P &lt; 0.01) and 2.5% higher calcaneal BMD (P &lt; 0.05) than the boys. Both calcaneal and forearm BMD were significantly related to total time of daily physical activity as well as with intense physical activity above all the chosen cut-off points (all P &lt; 0.05). The beta value for mean count center dot min(-1) physical activity was significantly lower than that for all the chosen cut-off points of vigorous activity both for calcaneal and distal forearm BMD. This study suggests that both habitual daily physical activity and amount of vigorous physical activity in children aged 6-8 years are associated with appendicular BMD.},
  author       = {Hasselstrom, H. and Karlsson, Magnus and Hansen, S. E. and Gronfeldt, V. and Froberg, K. and Andersen, L. B.},
  issn         = {1432-0827},
  keyword      = {bone mineral density,bone mineral content,physical activity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {31--38},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Calcified Tissue International},
  title        = {Peripheral bone mineral density and different intensities of physical activity in children 6-8 years old: The Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00223-006-0137-9},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2007},
}