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Clusters/networks promote food innovations

Beckeman, Märit LU and Skjöldebrand, Christina LU (2007) In Journal of Food Engineering 79(4). p.1418-1425
Abstract
Innovations are necessary for growth and competitiveness, but few are taking place in the food industry. Clusters and networks in regions/countries are seen as one way of increasing the chances to compete, based on Porter's theories in 1990. Before that some articles existed about agglomeration, clustering of industries etc. but not many examples in the food industry seem to have been studied. This paper describes the major innovations and changes since 1945 in the food sector, based on open-ended interviews with experts in the field, and the society is analysed in line with the factors proposed by Porter in his "diamond". Frozen food was seen as the really new innovation on the Swedish market and the paper describes how this new... (More)
Innovations are necessary for growth and competitiveness, but few are taking place in the food industry. Clusters and networks in regions/countries are seen as one way of increasing the chances to compete, based on Porter's theories in 1990. Before that some articles existed about agglomeration, clustering of industries etc. but not many examples in the food industry seem to have been studied. This paper describes the major innovations and changes since 1945 in the food sector, based on open-ended interviews with experts in the field, and the society is analysed in line with the factors proposed by Porter in his "diamond". Frozen food was seen as the really new innovation on the Swedish market and the paper describes how this new technology was introduced and gained acceptance. A network of individuals and organisations assembled around the Frozen Food Institute, backed by the government, and worked on creating and getting the information across to everyone in the supply chain. A cluster of food producers and supporting industries formed spontaneously in the south of Sweden and existed until the technology became a commodity. In the terms of current literature the cluster was a "bottom-up" initiative, with several entrepreneurs involved. The chances for radical or new food innovations are discussed, but they are going to require other actors and to overcome the generally negative attitude today towards industry and the food industry in particular. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
packaging, innovation, chilled food, radical-new-incremental, self-service, frozen food, logistics, packaging logistics
in
Journal of Food Engineering
volume
79
issue
4
pages
1418 - 1425
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000242649300041
  • scopus:33750945277
ISSN
0260-8774
DOI
10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2006.04.024
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
61cb58a8-a552-4b1b-a61c-ab9b6d111338 (old id 683627)
date added to LUP
2007-12-05 10:36:45
date last changed
2017-10-29 04:25:55
@article{61cb58a8-a552-4b1b-a61c-ab9b6d111338,
  abstract     = {Innovations are necessary for growth and competitiveness, but few are taking place in the food industry. Clusters and networks in regions/countries are seen as one way of increasing the chances to compete, based on Porter's theories in 1990. Before that some articles existed about agglomeration, clustering of industries etc. but not many examples in the food industry seem to have been studied. This paper describes the major innovations and changes since 1945 in the food sector, based on open-ended interviews with experts in the field, and the society is analysed in line with the factors proposed by Porter in his "diamond". Frozen food was seen as the really new innovation on the Swedish market and the paper describes how this new technology was introduced and gained acceptance. A network of individuals and organisations assembled around the Frozen Food Institute, backed by the government, and worked on creating and getting the information across to everyone in the supply chain. A cluster of food producers and supporting industries formed spontaneously in the south of Sweden and existed until the technology became a commodity. In the terms of current literature the cluster was a "bottom-up" initiative, with several entrepreneurs involved. The chances for radical or new food innovations are discussed, but they are going to require other actors and to overcome the generally negative attitude today towards industry and the food industry in particular. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Beckeman, Märit and Skjöldebrand, Christina},
  issn         = {0260-8774},
  keyword      = {packaging,innovation,chilled food,radical-new-incremental,self-service,frozen food,logistics,packaging logistics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1418--1425},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Food Engineering},
  title        = {Clusters/networks promote food innovations},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2006.04.024},
  volume       = {79},
  year         = {2007},
}