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Complement analysis in the 21st century

Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Jokiranta, T. Sakari; Truedsson, Lennart LU ; Nilsson, Bo; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago and Kirschfink, Michael (2007) In Molecular Immunology 44(16). p.3838-3849
Abstract
Complement analysis in the clinic is usually associated with the quantification of C3 and C4, measurement of C1-inhibitor and screening for complement activity. These analyses have been available in routine diagnostic laboratories for decades. In recent years, however, the field of complement analysis has expanded considerably, with the introduction of novel assays to detect complement activation products, and spreading still further towards genetic analysis to reveal the basis of complement deficiencies and identify mutations and polymorphisms associated with defined diseases such as atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome and age related macular degeneration. Here we review the current status of complement analysis, including assays for the... (More)
Complement analysis in the clinic is usually associated with the quantification of C3 and C4, measurement of C1-inhibitor and screening for complement activity. These analyses have been available in routine diagnostic laboratories for decades. In recent years, however, the field of complement analysis has expanded considerably, with the introduction of novel assays to detect complement activation products, and spreading still further towards genetic analysis to reveal the basis of complement deficiencies and identify mutations and polymorphisms associated with defined diseases such as atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome and age related macular degeneration. Here we review the current status of complement analysis, including assays for the quantification of complement activity and complement activation products, together with genetic methods for the detection of deficiencies, mutations and polymorphisms. This is an area where significant developments have been made recently, paralleling the research advances into the role of complement in human disease. It is clear, however, that there is a need for consensus and standardisation of analytical methods. This will be a major challenge for the complement society in the future. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
genetic analyses, proteomic analyses, complement assay, neoepitope
in
Molecular Immunology
volume
44
issue
16
pages
3838 - 3849
publisher
Pergamon
external identifiers
  • wos:000249512100003
  • scopus:34548321363
ISSN
1872-9142
DOI
10.1016/j.molimm.2007.06.150
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0bc0ff11-d861-4b5b-893c-9ece8fe3ee23 (old id 687732)
date added to LUP
2007-12-13 15:33:59
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:50:55
@article{0bc0ff11-d861-4b5b-893c-9ece8fe3ee23,
  abstract     = {Complement analysis in the clinic is usually associated with the quantification of C3 and C4, measurement of C1-inhibitor and screening for complement activity. These analyses have been available in routine diagnostic laboratories for decades. In recent years, however, the field of complement analysis has expanded considerably, with the introduction of novel assays to detect complement activation products, and spreading still further towards genetic analysis to reveal the basis of complement deficiencies and identify mutations and polymorphisms associated with defined diseases such as atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome and age related macular degeneration. Here we review the current status of complement analysis, including assays for the quantification of complement activity and complement activation products, together with genetic methods for the detection of deficiencies, mutations and polymorphisms. This is an area where significant developments have been made recently, paralleling the research advances into the role of complement in human disease. It is clear, however, that there is a need for consensus and standardisation of analytical methods. This will be a major challenge for the complement society in the future. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Mollnes, Tom Eirik and Jokiranta, T. Sakari and Truedsson, Lennart and Nilsson, Bo and Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago and Kirschfink, Michael},
  issn         = {1872-9142},
  keyword      = {genetic analyses,proteomic analyses,complement assay,neoepitope},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {16},
  pages        = {3838--3849},
  publisher    = {Pergamon},
  series       = {Molecular Immunology},
  title        = {Complement analysis in the 21st century},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molimm.2007.06.150},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2007},
}