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Reliability of the gross motor function measure in cerebral palsy

Nordmark, E. LU ; Hägglund, G. LU and Jarnlo, G. B. LU (1997) In Scandinavian Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine 29(1). p.25-28
Abstract

The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), an instrument comprising five dimensions devised by Russell and co-workers to measure gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP) or brain damage, enables changes in performance status to be evaluated after therapy or when monitored over time. We analysed its inter-rater and intra-rater reliability on the three most difficult dimensions. A video-recording of three children with CP performing test tasks was assessed on two occasions at an interval of six months by each of the 15 physiotherapists using the GMFM manual but without previous experience or training in the use of the instrument. Mean percentage scores were similar at the first and second assessments. Both inter- and... (More)

The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), an instrument comprising five dimensions devised by Russell and co-workers to measure gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP) or brain damage, enables changes in performance status to be evaluated after therapy or when monitored over time. We analysed its inter-rater and intra-rater reliability on the three most difficult dimensions. A video-recording of three children with CP performing test tasks was assessed on two occasions at an interval of six months by each of the 15 physiotherapists using the GMFM manual but without previous experience or training in the use of the instrument. Mean percentage scores were similar at the first and second assessments. Both inter- and intra-rater reliabilities were good, inter-rater reliability being 0.77 and 0.88 at the first and second assessments, respectively, and intra-rater reliability 0.68 at the second assessment. The findings suggest the GMFM to be a useful and reliable instrument for assessing motor function and treatment outcome in CP.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cerebral palsy, children, motor function, reliability, video-recording
in
Scandinavian Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
volume
29
issue
1
pages
25 - 28
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:9084102
  • scopus:0030936923
ISSN
0036-5505
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
6883dcad-7619-4eb9-a6c0-1eca4be228f0
date added to LUP
2019-06-25 09:49:30
date last changed
2020-01-13 02:06:12
@article{6883dcad-7619-4eb9-a6c0-1eca4be228f0,
  abstract     = {<p>The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), an instrument comprising five dimensions devised by Russell and co-workers to measure gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP) or brain damage, enables changes in performance status to be evaluated after therapy or when monitored over time. We analysed its inter-rater and intra-rater reliability on the three most difficult dimensions. A video-recording of three children with CP performing test tasks was assessed on two occasions at an interval of six months by each of the 15 physiotherapists using the GMFM manual but without previous experience or training in the use of the instrument. Mean percentage scores were similar at the first and second assessments. Both inter- and intra-rater reliabilities were good, inter-rater reliability being 0.77 and 0.88 at the first and second assessments, respectively, and intra-rater reliability 0.68 at the second assessment. The findings suggest the GMFM to be a useful and reliable instrument for assessing motor function and treatment outcome in CP.</p>},
  author       = {Nordmark, E. and Hägglund, G. and Jarnlo, G. B.},
  issn         = {0036-5505},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {25--28},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine},
  title        = {Reliability of the gross motor function measure in cerebral palsy},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {1997},
}