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Alcohol, smoking and human papillomavirus in laryngeal carcinoma: a Nordic prospective multicenter study

Koskinen, Walter J.; Brondbo, Kjell; Dahlstrand, Hanna Mellin; Luostarinen, Tapio; Hakulinen, Timo; Leivo, Ilmo; Molijn, Anco; Quint, Wim G.; Roysland, Tov and Munck-Wikland, Eva, et al. (2007) In Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology 133(9). p.673-678
Abstract
Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been linked to oropharyngeal carcinomas, but its role in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is not clear. A prospective multicenter study based on known tumor-cell percentage of fresh frozen carcinoma biopsies was established to determine the HPV prevalence. Moreover risk factors such as smoking, alcohol abuse, chronic laryngitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were evaluated Methods Fresh-frozen laryngeal cancer biopsies from 108 patients in Finland, Norway, and Sweden were investigated. Patients whose biopsy samples contained at least 20% tumor tissue (N = 69) entered the study. HPV DNA was determined with MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ nested PCR and SPF10 PCR hybridization assay. Patients... (More)
Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been linked to oropharyngeal carcinomas, but its role in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is not clear. A prospective multicenter study based on known tumor-cell percentage of fresh frozen carcinoma biopsies was established to determine the HPV prevalence. Moreover risk factors such as smoking, alcohol abuse, chronic laryngitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were evaluated Methods Fresh-frozen laryngeal cancer biopsies from 108 patients in Finland, Norway, and Sweden were investigated. Patients whose biopsy samples contained at least 20% tumor tissue (N = 69) entered the study. HPV DNA was determined with MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ nested PCR and SPF10 PCR hybridization assay. Patients were examined by an ENT specialist and an extensive questionnaire concerning risk factors was filled in. Results Only three patients (4.4%) harbored HPV DNA in their carcinoma sample. Heavy alcohol drinking was associated with an increased risk of death, advanced-stage disease, and younger age at diagnosis. Chronic laryngitis, GERD, and orogenital sex contacts were rare. Poor oral hygiene was not associated with survival, although it correlated with heavy drinking. Conclusion In our series HPV was not important in LSCC. Heavy drinking led to major mortality in LSCC and promoted early carcinogenesis. (Less)
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keywords
laryngeal cancer, chronic laryngitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, squamous cell carcinoma
in
Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology
volume
133
issue
9
pages
673 - 678
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000248116100011
  • scopus:34447518545
ISSN
1432-1335
DOI
10.1007/s00432-007-0219-8
language
English
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yes
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05d25f77-63ea-4599-845b-8efba8e33126 (old id 691814)
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2007-12-12 14:53:08
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2017-09-24 03:43:19
@article{05d25f77-63ea-4599-845b-8efba8e33126,
  abstract     = {Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been linked to oropharyngeal carcinomas, but its role in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is not clear. A prospective multicenter study based on known tumor-cell percentage of fresh frozen carcinoma biopsies was established to determine the HPV prevalence. Moreover risk factors such as smoking, alcohol abuse, chronic laryngitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were evaluated Methods Fresh-frozen laryngeal cancer biopsies from 108 patients in Finland, Norway, and Sweden were investigated. Patients whose biopsy samples contained at least 20% tumor tissue (N = 69) entered the study. HPV DNA was determined with MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ nested PCR and SPF10 PCR hybridization assay. Patients were examined by an ENT specialist and an extensive questionnaire concerning risk factors was filled in. Results Only three patients (4.4%) harbored HPV DNA in their carcinoma sample. Heavy alcohol drinking was associated with an increased risk of death, advanced-stage disease, and younger age at diagnosis. Chronic laryngitis, GERD, and orogenital sex contacts were rare. Poor oral hygiene was not associated with survival, although it correlated with heavy drinking. Conclusion In our series HPV was not important in LSCC. Heavy drinking led to major mortality in LSCC and promoted early carcinogenesis.},
  author       = {Koskinen, Walter J. and Brondbo, Kjell and Dahlstrand, Hanna Mellin and Luostarinen, Tapio and Hakulinen, Timo and Leivo, Ilmo and Molijn, Anco and Quint, Wim G. and Roysland, Tov and Munck-Wikland, Eva and Makitie, Antti A. and Pyykko, Ilmari and Dillner, Joakim and Vaheri, Antti and Aaltonen, Leena-Maija},
  issn         = {1432-1335},
  keyword      = {laryngeal cancer,chronic laryngitis,gastroesophageal reflux disease,squamous cell carcinoma},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {673--678},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology},
  title        = {Alcohol, smoking and human papillomavirus in laryngeal carcinoma: a Nordic prospective multicenter study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00432-007-0219-8},
  volume       = {133},
  year         = {2007},
}