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Stability of IQ measures in teenagers and young adults with developmental dyslexia

Ingesson, Gunnel LU (2006) In Dyslexia 12(2). p.81-95
Abstract
A follow-up study was performed to investigate the stability of IQ measures in a group of dyslexic teenagers and young adults. Earlier research had shown contradictory results. The 65 subjects, 12 years old on the average at first test, were retested after a mean interval of six and a half years. There was a significant relative decrease in verbal IQ (VIQ), which was interpreted as either an effect of low reliability of tests used, or an effect of the dyslexic individuals' less experience with reading and writing, and as a consequence, a lag in verbal ability, the second interpretation being in line with earlier findings in groups of children with learning disabilities. Performance IQ improved significantly and the tentative interpretation... (More)
A follow-up study was performed to investigate the stability of IQ measures in a group of dyslexic teenagers and young adults. Earlier research had shown contradictory results. The 65 subjects, 12 years old on the average at first test, were retested after a mean interval of six and a half years. There was a significant relative decrease in verbal IQ (VIQ), which was interpreted as either an effect of low reliability of tests used, or an effect of the dyslexic individuals' less experience with reading and writing, and as a consequence, a lag in verbal ability, the second interpretation being in line with earlier findings in groups of children with learning disabilities. Performance IQ improved significantly and the tentative interpretation was that of a compensatory process, in the sense that the dyslexic children might develop a more visual, intuitive and creative way to process information and solve problems. The conclusion was that caution should be taken, before making important decisions on the basis of a single intelligence test, and that dyslexic children might be at risk to lag behind their peers in terms of VIQ, especially if they are not provided with suitable special education. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
follow-up, developmental dyslexia, cognitive development, IQ stability
in
Dyslexia
volume
12
issue
2
pages
81 - 95
publisher
John Wiley and Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:16734353
  • wos:000237715900001
  • scopus:33646598027
ISSN
1076-9242
DOI
10.1002/dys.306
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9ec81b93-5da7-4cdc-92f3-42c4a7f84cae (old id 693216)
alternative location
http://80-www3.interscience.wiley.com.ludwig.lub.lu.se/cgi-bin/fulltext/112208664/PDFSTART
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:02:32
date last changed
2021-09-01 04:19:56
@article{9ec81b93-5da7-4cdc-92f3-42c4a7f84cae,
  abstract     = {A follow-up study was performed to investigate the stability of IQ measures in a group of dyslexic teenagers and young adults. Earlier research had shown contradictory results. The 65 subjects, 12 years old on the average at first test, were retested after a mean interval of six and a half years. There was a significant relative decrease in verbal IQ (VIQ), which was interpreted as either an effect of low reliability of tests used, or an effect of the dyslexic individuals' less experience with reading and writing, and as a consequence, a lag in verbal ability, the second interpretation being in line with earlier findings in groups of children with learning disabilities. Performance IQ improved significantly and the tentative interpretation was that of a compensatory process, in the sense that the dyslexic children might develop a more visual, intuitive and creative way to process information and solve problems. The conclusion was that caution should be taken, before making important decisions on the basis of a single intelligence test, and that dyslexic children might be at risk to lag behind their peers in terms of VIQ, especially if they are not provided with suitable special education. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Ingesson, Gunnel},
  issn         = {1076-9242},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {81--95},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons},
  series       = {Dyslexia},
  title        = {Stability of IQ measures in teenagers and young adults with developmental dyslexia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dys.306},
  doi          = {10.1002/dys.306},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2006},
}