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Increase of bioavailable testosterone is associated with gain in bone mineral density after cure of primary hyperparathyroidism in postmenopausal women

Almqvist, Erik LU ; Becker, Charlotte LU ; Bondeson, Anne-Greth LU ; Bondeson, Lennart LU and Svensson, J (2006) In Clinical Endocrinology 64(1). p.58-62
Abstract
Objective The recovery of bone mineral density (BMD) after surgical cure of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) seems to be multifactorial and not just dependent on declining PTH. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of sex steroids in this context. Design and patients Thirty-six postmenopausal women with PHPT were examined before and 1 year after curative parathyroidectomy. Their mean age at inclusion in the study was 71.7 +/- 1.1 years (range 54-83). BMD was measured in hip and lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. No patient received any replacement therapy with sex hormones or treatment with corticosteroids, oestrogen receptor modulators or bisphosphonates. Measurements Serum concentrations of oestradiol,... (More)
Objective The recovery of bone mineral density (BMD) after surgical cure of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) seems to be multifactorial and not just dependent on declining PTH. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of sex steroids in this context. Design and patients Thirty-six postmenopausal women with PHPT were examined before and 1 year after curative parathyroidectomy. Their mean age at inclusion in the study was 71.7 +/- 1.1 years (range 54-83). BMD was measured in hip and lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. No patient received any replacement therapy with sex hormones or treatment with corticosteroids, oestrogen receptor modulators or bisphosphonates. Measurements Serum concentrations of oestradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, SHBG, PTH and calcium. Results Postoperative increase of free (bioavailable) testosterone was positively correlated to the change of BMD in the hip (P < 0.01), whereas the change of PTH in serum correlated to the change of BMD in the lumbar spine (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that bioavailable testosterone was the most important determinant of change in BMD in both spine and hip (femoral neck: P < 0.05; Ward's triangle: P < 0.001; trochanter: P < 0.01; lumbar spine: P < 0.05). The increase of bioavailable testosterone after curative parathyroidectomy was related to declining SHBG. Conclusions An increase of bioavailable testosterone following surgical cure of PHPT is related to improvement of hip and lumbar spine BMD in postmenopausal women. This previously unknown hormonal interaction may also be important to other aspects of hyperparathyroidism. (Less)
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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Endocrinology
volume
64
issue
1
pages
58 - 62
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000234030600009
  • pmid:16402929
  • scopus:33644953045
ISSN
1365-2265
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2265.2005.02416.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Clinical Chemistry, Malmö (013016000), Surgery (013242200), Pathology (Malmö) (013031000), Surgery Research Unit (013242220), Emergency medicine/Medicine/Surgery (013240200)
id
fdb6a9bc-f16b-4ca6-951e-b599a85a591b (old id 693765)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:08:22
date last changed
2021-09-22 05:44:22
@article{fdb6a9bc-f16b-4ca6-951e-b599a85a591b,
  abstract     = {Objective The recovery of bone mineral density (BMD) after surgical cure of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) seems to be multifactorial and not just dependent on declining PTH. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of sex steroids in this context. Design and patients Thirty-six postmenopausal women with PHPT were examined before and 1 year after curative parathyroidectomy. Their mean age at inclusion in the study was 71.7 +/- 1.1 years (range 54-83). BMD was measured in hip and lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. No patient received any replacement therapy with sex hormones or treatment with corticosteroids, oestrogen receptor modulators or bisphosphonates. Measurements Serum concentrations of oestradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, SHBG, PTH and calcium. Results Postoperative increase of free (bioavailable) testosterone was positively correlated to the change of BMD in the hip (P &lt; 0.01), whereas the change of PTH in serum correlated to the change of BMD in the lumbar spine (P &lt; 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that bioavailable testosterone was the most important determinant of change in BMD in both spine and hip (femoral neck: P &lt; 0.05; Ward's triangle: P &lt; 0.001; trochanter: P &lt; 0.01; lumbar spine: P &lt; 0.05). The increase of bioavailable testosterone after curative parathyroidectomy was related to declining SHBG. Conclusions An increase of bioavailable testosterone following surgical cure of PHPT is related to improvement of hip and lumbar spine BMD in postmenopausal women. This previously unknown hormonal interaction may also be important to other aspects of hyperparathyroidism.},
  author       = {Almqvist, Erik and Becker, Charlotte and Bondeson, Anne-Greth and Bondeson, Lennart and Svensson, J},
  issn         = {1365-2265},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {58--62},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Clinical Endocrinology},
  title        = {Increase of bioavailable testosterone is associated with gain in bone mineral density after cure of primary hyperparathyroidism in postmenopausal women},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2265.2005.02416.x},
  doi          = {10.1111/j.1365-2265.2005.02416.x},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2006},
}