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Conflicting selection pressures on reproductive functions and speciation in plants.

Lankinen, Åsa LU and Larsson, Mattias C (2009) In Evolutionary Ecology 23(1). p.147-157
Abstract
Recent developments in the field of genetic divergence and speciation focus more on diversifying processes than on geographic mode of speciation (i.e. allopatric versus sympatric). Some of these new theories concern speciation driven by conflicts between the sexes. Even though it is well known that the two reproductive functions in plants can have different selective optima, sexual selection in plants is by many assumed to be weak or non-existent. Here we outline potential sexual conflicts in plants and discuss how selection pressures generated by such conflicts may influence genetic divergence. There is opportunity for conflicting selection pressures between individuals, such as manipulative pollen traits that enhance male reproductive... (More)
Recent developments in the field of genetic divergence and speciation focus more on diversifying processes than on geographic mode of speciation (i.e. allopatric versus sympatric). Some of these new theories concern speciation driven by conflicts between the sexes. Even though it is well known that the two reproductive functions in plants can have different selective optima, sexual selection in plants is by many assumed to be weak or non-existent. Here we outline potential sexual conflicts in plants and discuss how selection pressures generated by such conflicts may influence genetic divergence. There is opportunity for conflicting selection pressures between individuals, such as manipulative pollen traits that enhance male reproductive success at the expense of the female reproductive function. Within individual plants, fitness of the male function (pollen export) and fitness of the female function (pollen import) may be optimised by different traits, leading to conflicting selection pressures in relation to pollen transfer. This may affect selection for floral specialisation versus floral generalisation in animal-pollinated species. We believe that selection pressures generated by sexual conflict need to be appreciated in order to fully understand microevolutionary processes which may lead to genetic divergence and speciation in plants. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Pollen competition, Pollination, Reproductive isolation, Sexual conflicts, Specialisation, Speciation
in
Evolutionary Ecology
volume
23
issue
1
pages
147 - 157
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000262504800011
  • scopus:58349094626
ISSN
0269-7653
DOI
10.1007/s10682-007-9227-z
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c0db55a3-ff92-4c1a-823e-67f94fc8a76f (old id 698617)
date added to LUP
2009-07-08 16:33:33
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:53:55
@inproceedings{c0db55a3-ff92-4c1a-823e-67f94fc8a76f,
  abstract     = {Recent developments in the field of genetic divergence and speciation focus more on diversifying processes than on geographic mode of speciation (i.e. allopatric versus sympatric). Some of these new theories concern speciation driven by conflicts between the sexes. Even though it is well known that the two reproductive functions in plants can have different selective optima, sexual selection in plants is by many assumed to be weak or non-existent. Here we outline potential sexual conflicts in plants and discuss how selection pressures generated by such conflicts may influence genetic divergence. There is opportunity for conflicting selection pressures between individuals, such as manipulative pollen traits that enhance male reproductive success at the expense of the female reproductive function. Within individual plants, fitness of the male function (pollen export) and fitness of the female function (pollen import) may be optimised by different traits, leading to conflicting selection pressures in relation to pollen transfer. This may affect selection for floral specialisation versus floral generalisation in animal-pollinated species. We believe that selection pressures generated by sexual conflict need to be appreciated in order to fully understand microevolutionary processes which may lead to genetic divergence and speciation in plants.},
  author       = {Lankinen, Åsa and Larsson, Mattias C},
  booktitle    = {Evolutionary Ecology},
  issn         = {0269-7653},
  keyword      = {Pollen competition,Pollination,Reproductive isolation,Sexual conflicts,Specialisation,Speciation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {147--157},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  title        = {Conflicting selection pressures on reproductive functions and speciation in plants.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10682-007-9227-z},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2009},
}