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Phototoxicity

Björn, Lars Olof LU and Huovinen, Pirjo (2008) In Photobiology — The science of life and light, 2nd. ed. p.479-502
Abstract
Phototoxicity occurs when a substance is toxic only under the action of light, and can, depending on the mechanism of toxic action, be divided into type I and type II phototoxicity. Other types are sometimes recongnized, and sometimes toxicity occurs through more than one mechanism. Plants often use phototoxins for their defense. They may be harmful to man, but also exploited for medical treatments. On the other hand, drugs selected for other properties may show unwanted phototoxicity. Some fungi produce phototoxins. Due to other kinds of poisoning or to disease even the human or animal body may produce phototoxins and be harmed by them. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), widespread environmental contaminants, have a potential to... (More)
Phototoxicity occurs when a substance is toxic only under the action of light, and can, depending on the mechanism of toxic action, be divided into type I and type II phototoxicity. Other types are sometimes recongnized, and sometimes toxicity occurs through more than one mechanism. Plants often use phototoxins for their defense. They may be harmful to man, but also exploited for medical treatments. On the other hand, drugs selected for other properties may show unwanted phototoxicity. Some fungi produce phototoxins. Due to other kinds of poisoning or to disease even the human or animal body may produce phototoxins and be harmed by them. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), widespread environmental contaminants, have a potential to become toxic or acquire increased toxicity when they inter-act with natural or simulated sunlight. Because of their chemical structure numerous PAHs absorb energy in the UV waveband. Phototoxicity of PAHs occurs mainly via photosensitiza-tion and/or photomodification reactions: photosensitization reactions of bioaccumulated PAHs in biological matrices are regarded as important mechanisms for phototoxicity, but PAHs may also be photomodified into more toxic form e.g. via photooxidation. Phototoxicity of PAHs has been demonstrated in a variety of aquatic organisms, responses ranging from acute lethality to chronic effects. However, a variety of factors affecting the exposure of organisms to PAHs and to UV radiation, as well as interactions between multiple environ-mental factors and stressors present in natural conditions complicate the risk assessment for phototoxicity. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Plant defense Fungal plant parasites Drugs Cosmetics Porphyrin Porphyria Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon PAH Aquatic biota 8-methoxypsoralen Psoralen Photodynamic action Cercospora Phenanthrene Retene Pyrene Anthracene HOMO-LUMO
in
Photobiology — The science of life and light, 2nd. ed.
editor
Björn, Lars Olof and
pages
479 - 502
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:84900264135
ISBN
978-0-387-72654-0
DOI
10.1007/978-0-387-72655-7_18
project
Photobiology
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3bd623ff-8bf6-4c74-94a7-aa2055d1daba (old id 699799)
date added to LUP
2007-12-30 12:10:51
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:08:15
@inbook{3bd623ff-8bf6-4c74-94a7-aa2055d1daba,
  abstract     = {Phototoxicity occurs when a substance is toxic only under the action of light, and can, depending on the mechanism of toxic action, be divided into type I and type II phototoxicity. Other types are sometimes recongnized, and sometimes toxicity occurs through more than one mechanism. Plants often use phototoxins for their defense. They may be harmful to man, but also exploited for medical treatments. On the other hand, drugs selected for other properties may show unwanted phototoxicity. Some fungi produce phototoxins. Due to other kinds of poisoning or to disease even the human or animal body may produce phototoxins and be harmed by them. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), widespread environmental contaminants, have a potential to become toxic or acquire increased toxicity when they inter-act with natural or simulated sunlight. Because of their chemical structure numerous PAHs absorb energy in the UV waveband. Phototoxicity of PAHs occurs mainly via photosensitiza-tion and/or photomodification reactions: photosensitization reactions of bioaccumulated PAHs in biological matrices are regarded as important mechanisms for phototoxicity, but PAHs may also be photomodified into more toxic form e.g. via photooxidation. Phototoxicity of PAHs has been demonstrated in a variety of aquatic organisms, responses ranging from acute lethality to chronic effects. However, a variety of factors affecting the exposure of organisms to PAHs and to UV radiation, as well as interactions between multiple environ-mental factors and stressors present in natural conditions complicate the risk assessment for phototoxicity.},
  author       = {Björn, Lars Olof and Huovinen, Pirjo},
  editor       = {Björn, Lars Olof},
  isbn         = {978-0-387-72654-0},
  keyword      = {Plant defense
Fungal plant parasites
Drugs
Cosmetics
Porphyrin
Porphyria
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon
PAH
Aquatic biota
8-methoxypsoralen
Psoralen
Photodynamic action
Cercospora
Phenanthrene
Retene
Pyrene
Anthracene
HOMO-LUMO},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {479--502},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Photobiology — The science of life and light, 2nd. ed.},
  title        = {Phototoxicity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-72655-7_18},
  year         = {2008},
}