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Social constraints and psychological well-being after prostate cancer : A follow-up at 12 and 24 months after surgery

Stinesen Kollberg, Karin; Thorsteinsdottir, Thordis; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Hugosson, Jonas; Wiklund, Peter; Bjartell, Anders LU ; Carlsson, Stefan; Stranne, Johan; Haglind, Eva and Steineck, Gunnar (2018) In Psycho-Oncology 27(2). p.668-675
Abstract

Objective: Studies indicate that social constraints (barriers to emotional expression) may be a risk factor for psychological morbidity. We aimed to investigate the association between prostate cancer–related social constraints and psychological well-being following prostate cancer surgery. Methods: In a group of 3478 partnered patients, participating in the Laparoscopic Prostatectomy Robot Open trial, a prospective multicenter comparative study of robot-assisted laparoscopic and retropubic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer, we used log-binomial regression analysis to investigate the links between prostate cancer–related social constraints at 3 months after surgery and psychological well-being at 12 and 24 months. Results: A... (More)

Objective: Studies indicate that social constraints (barriers to emotional expression) may be a risk factor for psychological morbidity. We aimed to investigate the association between prostate cancer–related social constraints and psychological well-being following prostate cancer surgery. Methods: In a group of 3478 partnered patients, participating in the Laparoscopic Prostatectomy Robot Open trial, a prospective multicenter comparative study of robot-assisted laparoscopic and retropubic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer, we used log-binomial regression analysis to investigate the links between prostate cancer–related social constraints at 3 months after surgery and psychological well-being at 12 and 24 months. Results: A total of 1086 and 1093 men reported low well-being at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Prostate cancer-related social constraints by partner predicted low psychological well-being at 12 months (adjusted RR: 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.9) and by others (adjusted RR: 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.5). Intrusive thoughts mediated the association. Conclusions: Negative responses from the social environment, especially from partner to talking about the prostate cancer experience affected patients' psychological well-being 2 years after radical prostatectomy. Results emphasize the importance of helping patients mobilize psychosocial resources within their social network, especially among those with a lack of quality psychosocial support.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cancer, oncology, partner, prostate cancer, psychological well-being, social constraints
in
Psycho-Oncology
volume
27
issue
2
pages
8 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:85041721602
ISSN
1057-9249
DOI
10.1002/pon.4561
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6a90971b-051c-430a-935b-db5cd2988efd
date added to LUP
2018-03-06 13:13:45
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:06:50
@article{6a90971b-051c-430a-935b-db5cd2988efd,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: Studies indicate that social constraints (barriers to emotional expression) may be a risk factor for psychological morbidity. We aimed to investigate the association between prostate cancer–related social constraints and psychological well-being following prostate cancer surgery. Methods: In a group of 3478 partnered patients, participating in the Laparoscopic Prostatectomy Robot Open trial, a prospective multicenter comparative study of robot-assisted laparoscopic and retropubic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer, we used log-binomial regression analysis to investigate the links between prostate cancer–related social constraints at 3 months after surgery and psychological well-being at 12 and 24 months. Results: A total of 1086 and 1093 men reported low well-being at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Prostate cancer-related social constraints by partner predicted low psychological well-being at 12 months (adjusted RR: 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.9) and by others (adjusted RR: 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.5). Intrusive thoughts mediated the association. Conclusions: Negative responses from the social environment, especially from partner to talking about the prostate cancer experience affected patients' psychological well-being 2 years after radical prostatectomy. Results emphasize the importance of helping patients mobilize psychosocial resources within their social network, especially among those with a lack of quality psychosocial support.</p>},
  author       = {Stinesen Kollberg, Karin and Thorsteinsdottir, Thordis and Wilderäng, Ulrica and Hugosson, Jonas and Wiklund, Peter and Bjartell, Anders and Carlsson, Stefan and Stranne, Johan and Haglind, Eva and Steineck, Gunnar},
  issn         = {1057-9249},
  keyword      = {cancer,oncology,partner,prostate cancer,psychological well-being,social constraints},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {668--675},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Psycho-Oncology},
  title        = {Social constraints and psychological well-being after prostate cancer : A follow-up at 12 and 24 months after surgery},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.4561},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2018},
}