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Detection of adeno-associated virus type 2 genome in cervical carcinoma

Zheng, BY; Li, XD; Wiklund, F; Chowdhry, S; Angstrom, T; Hallmans, G; Dillner, Joakim LU and Wallin, KL (2006) In British Journal of Cancer 94(12). p.1913-1917
Abstract
Adeno-associated virus (AAV) can impair the replication of other viruses. Adeno-associated virus seroprevalences have been reported to be lower among women with cervical cancer. In-vitro, AAV can interfere with the production of human papillomavirus virions. Adeno-associated virus-2 DNA has also been detected in cervical cancer tissue, although not consistently. To evaluate the role of AAV infection in relation to invasive cervical cancer, we performed a nested case-control study within a retrospectively followed population-based cohort. A total of 104 women who developed invasive cervical cancer on average 5.6 years of follow-up (range: 0.5 months-26.2 years) and 104 matched control-women who did not develop cervical cancer during the... (More)
Adeno-associated virus (AAV) can impair the replication of other viruses. Adeno-associated virus seroprevalences have been reported to be lower among women with cervical cancer. In-vitro, AAV can interfere with the production of human papillomavirus virions. Adeno-associated virus-2 DNA has also been detected in cervical cancer tissue, although not consistently. To evaluate the role of AAV infection in relation to invasive cervical cancer, we performed a nested case-control study within a retrospectively followed population-based cohort. A total of 104 women who developed invasive cervical cancer on average 5.6 years of follow-up (range: 0.5 months-26.2 years) and 104 matched control-women who did not develop cervical cancer during the same follow-up time were tested for AAV and human papillomavirus by polymerase chain reaction. At baseline, two (2%) case-women and three (3%) control-women were positive for AAV-2 DNA. At the time of cancer diagnosis, 12 (12%) case-women and 3 ( 3%) matched control-women were positive for AAV-2 DNA. Persisting AAV infection was not evident. In conclusion, AAV-2 DNA was present in a low proportion of cervical cancers and we found no evidence that the presence of AAV in cervical smears of healthy women would be associated with reduced risk of cervical cancer. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cervical cancer, adeno-associated virus, AAV, human papillomavirus, HPV
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
94
issue
12
pages
1913 - 1917
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:16736006
  • wos:000238288000022
  • scopus:33745069667
ISSN
1532-1827
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6603179
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6ab199c9-5fa4-42d5-a18e-96343e4057e2 (old id 406245)
date added to LUP
2007-10-21 09:05:21
date last changed
2019-02-20 04:28:22
@article{6ab199c9-5fa4-42d5-a18e-96343e4057e2,
  abstract     = {Adeno-associated virus (AAV) can impair the replication of other viruses. Adeno-associated virus seroprevalences have been reported to be lower among women with cervical cancer. In-vitro, AAV can interfere with the production of human papillomavirus virions. Adeno-associated virus-2 DNA has also been detected in cervical cancer tissue, although not consistently. To evaluate the role of AAV infection in relation to invasive cervical cancer, we performed a nested case-control study within a retrospectively followed population-based cohort. A total of 104 women who developed invasive cervical cancer on average 5.6 years of follow-up (range: 0.5 months-26.2 years) and 104 matched control-women who did not develop cervical cancer during the same follow-up time were tested for AAV and human papillomavirus by polymerase chain reaction. At baseline, two (2%) case-women and three (3%) control-women were positive for AAV-2 DNA. At the time of cancer diagnosis, 12 (12%) case-women and 3 ( 3%) matched control-women were positive for AAV-2 DNA. Persisting AAV infection was not evident. In conclusion, AAV-2 DNA was present in a low proportion of cervical cancers and we found no evidence that the presence of AAV in cervical smears of healthy women would be associated with reduced risk of cervical cancer.},
  author       = {Zheng, BY and Li, XD and Wiklund, F and Chowdhry, S and Angstrom, T and Hallmans, G and Dillner, Joakim and Wallin, KL},
  issn         = {1532-1827},
  keyword      = {cervical cancer,adeno-associated virus,AAV,human papillomavirus,HPV},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1913--1917},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Detection of adeno-associated virus type 2 genome in cervical carcinoma},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6603179},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2006},
}