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Hand preference for bimanual and unimanual feeding in captive gorillas : Extension in a second colony of apes

Lambert, Megan LU (2012) In American Journal of Physical Anthropology 148(4). p.641-647
Abstract
Right-hand dominance is widely considered to be a uniquely human trait. Whether nonhuman primates exhibit similar population-level hand preferences remains a topic of considerable debate. Despite extensive research focusing on laterality in nonhuman primates, our interpretation of these studies is limited due to methodological issues including the lack of a common measure of hand preference and the use of tasks that may not be reliable indicators of handedness. The use of consistent methods between studies is necessary to enable comparisons within and between species and allow for more general conclusions to be drawn from these results. The present study replicates methods used in recent research reporting population-level right-handedness... (More)
Right-hand dominance is widely considered to be a uniquely human trait. Whether nonhuman primates exhibit similar population-level hand preferences remains a topic of considerable debate. Despite extensive research focusing on laterality in nonhuman primates, our interpretation of these studies is limited due to methodological issues including the lack of a common measure of hand preference and the use of tasks that may not be reliable indicators of handedness. The use of consistent methods between studies is necessary to enable comparisons within and between species and allow for more general conclusions to be drawn from these results. The present study replicates methods used in recent research reporting population-level right-handedness in captive gorillas (Meguerditchian et al.,2010). Observational data were collected on hand preference for unimanual and bimanual feeding in 14 captive western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Individual-level preferences were found, primarily for bimanual feeding; however, the data reveal no group-level directional bias (contra Meguerditchian et al.). Like the study by Meguerditchian et al. (2010), though, bimanual feeding revealed significantly stronger hand preferences than unimanual reaching, and age, sex, group membership, or rearing history had no effect on hand preference. Finally, variations in diet and corresponding grip type between studies suggest that hand preferences may vary across bimanual tasks depending on grip morphology. This study aims to contribute to our existing knowledge of primate laterality by increasing the number of individuals investigated using methods that allow for comparisons with similar research. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
handedness, bimanual, unimanual, hemispheric specialization
in
American Journal of Physical Anthropology
volume
148
issue
4
pages
641 - 647
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:84863721239
ISSN
0002-9483
DOI
10.1002/ajpa.22095
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6adf7ea0-9f48-4aea-b3f4-8fcb9e5f1eec
date added to LUP
2017-09-06 14:56:17
date last changed
2017-09-10 05:23:50
@article{6adf7ea0-9f48-4aea-b3f4-8fcb9e5f1eec,
  abstract     = {Right-hand dominance is widely considered to be a uniquely human trait. Whether nonhuman primates exhibit similar population-level hand preferences remains a topic of considerable debate. Despite extensive research focusing on laterality in nonhuman primates, our interpretation of these studies is limited due to methodological issues including the lack of a common measure of hand preference and the use of tasks that may not be reliable indicators of handedness. The use of consistent methods between studies is necessary to enable comparisons within and between species and allow for more general conclusions to be drawn from these results. The present study replicates methods used in recent research reporting population-level right-handedness in captive gorillas (Meguerditchian et al.,2010). Observational data were collected on hand preference for unimanual and bimanual feeding in 14 captive western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Individual-level preferences were found, primarily for bimanual feeding; however, the data reveal no group-level directional bias (contra Meguerditchian et al.). Like the study by Meguerditchian et al. (2010), though, bimanual feeding revealed significantly stronger hand preferences than unimanual reaching, and age, sex, group membership, or rearing history had no effect on hand preference. Finally, variations in diet and corresponding grip type between studies suggest that hand preferences may vary across bimanual tasks depending on grip morphology. This study aims to contribute to our existing knowledge of primate laterality by increasing the number of individuals investigated using methods that allow for comparisons with similar research.},
  author       = {Lambert, Megan},
  issn         = {0002-9483},
  keyword      = {handedness,bimanual,unimanual,hemispheric specialization},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {641--647},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {American Journal of Physical Anthropology},
  title        = {Hand preference for bimanual and unimanual feeding in captive gorillas : Extension in a second colony of apes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.22095},
  volume       = {148},
  year         = {2012},
}