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Microfluidics-based approaches to the isolation of African trypanosomes

Barrett, Michael P.; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Regnault, Clément; Holm, Stefan H. LU ; Beech, Jason P. LU ; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O. LU and Hochstetter, Axel (2017) In Pathogens 6(4).
Abstract

African trypanosomes are responsible for significant levels of disease in both humans and animals. The protozoan parasites are free-living flagellates, usually transmitted by arthropod vectors, including the tsetse fly. In the mammalian host they live in the bloodstream and, in the case of human-infectious species, later invade the central nervous system. Diagnosis of the disease requires the positive identification of parasites in the bloodstream. This can be particularly challenging where parasite numbers are low, as is often the case in peripheral blood. Enriching parasites from body fluids is an important part of the diagnostic pathway. As more is learned about the physicochemical properties of trypanosomes, this information can be... (More)

African trypanosomes are responsible for significant levels of disease in both humans and animals. The protozoan parasites are free-living flagellates, usually transmitted by arthropod vectors, including the tsetse fly. In the mammalian host they live in the bloodstream and, in the case of human-infectious species, later invade the central nervous system. Diagnosis of the disease requires the positive identification of parasites in the bloodstream. This can be particularly challenging where parasite numbers are low, as is often the case in peripheral blood. Enriching parasites from body fluids is an important part of the diagnostic pathway. As more is learned about the physicochemical properties of trypanosomes, this information can be exploited through use of different microfluidic-based approaches to isolate the parasites from blood or other fluids. Here, we discuss recent advances in the use of microfluidics to separate trypanosomes from blood and to isolate single trypanosomes for analyses including drug screening.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Concentration ramping, Diagnosis, Dielectrophoresis, DLD, Drug testing, Isolation, Microfluidics, Optical trap, Separation, Trypanosomes
in
Pathogens
volume
6
issue
4
publisher
MDPI AG
external identifiers
  • scopus:85032854907
  • wos:000417347700003
ISSN
2076-0817
DOI
10.3390/pathogens6040047
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6c77b847-6a78-4be2-b9e7-b140c5882a6c
date added to LUP
2017-11-22 08:39:27
date last changed
2018-02-22 03:00:30
@article{6c77b847-6a78-4be2-b9e7-b140c5882a6c,
  abstract     = {<p>African trypanosomes are responsible for significant levels of disease in both humans and animals. The protozoan parasites are free-living flagellates, usually transmitted by arthropod vectors, including the tsetse fly. In the mammalian host they live in the bloodstream and, in the case of human-infectious species, later invade the central nervous system. Diagnosis of the disease requires the positive identification of parasites in the bloodstream. This can be particularly challenging where parasite numbers are low, as is often the case in peripheral blood. Enriching parasites from body fluids is an important part of the diagnostic pathway. As more is learned about the physicochemical properties of trypanosomes, this information can be exploited through use of different microfluidic-based approaches to isolate the parasites from blood or other fluids. Here, we discuss recent advances in the use of microfluidics to separate trypanosomes from blood and to isolate single trypanosomes for analyses including drug screening.</p>},
  articleno    = {7},
  author       = {Barrett, Michael P. and Cooper, Jonathan M. and Regnault, Clément and Holm, Stefan H. and Beech, Jason P. and Tegenfeldt, Jonas O. and Hochstetter, Axel},
  issn         = {2076-0817},
  keyword      = {Concentration ramping,Diagnosis,Dielectrophoresis,DLD,Drug testing,Isolation,Microfluidics,Optical trap,Separation,Trypanosomes},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  number       = {4},
  publisher    = {MDPI AG},
  series       = {Pathogens},
  title        = {Microfluidics-based approaches to the isolation of African trypanosomes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pathogens6040047},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2017},
}