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Cardiovascular Diseases And Psychiatric Disorders During The Diagnostic Workup Of Suspected Hematological Malignancy

Liu, Qianwei ; Andersson, Therese Ml ; Jöud, Anna LU ; Shen, Qing ; Schelin, Maria Ec LU ; Magnusson, Patrik Ke ; Smedby, Karin E and Fang, Fang (2019) In Clinical Epidemiology 11. p.1025-1034
Abstract

Background: Little attention has been given to the risk of cardiovascular and psychiatric comorbidities during the clinical evaluation of a suspected hematological malignancy.

Methods: Based on Skåne Healthcare Register, we performed a population-based cohort study of 1,527,449 individuals residing during 2005-2014 in Skåne, Sweden. We calculated the incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of cardiovascular diseases or psychiatric disorders during the diagnostic workup of 5495 patients with hematological malignancy and 18,906 individuals that underwent a bone marrow aspiration or biopsy or lymph node biopsy without receiving a diagnosis of any malignancy ("biopsied individuals"), compared to individuals without such experience (i.e.,... (More)

Background: Little attention has been given to the risk of cardiovascular and psychiatric comorbidities during the clinical evaluation of a suspected hematological malignancy.

Methods: Based on Skåne Healthcare Register, we performed a population-based cohort study of 1,527,449 individuals residing during 2005-2014 in Skåne, Sweden. We calculated the incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of cardiovascular diseases or psychiatric disorders during the diagnostic workup of 5495 patients with hematological malignancy and 18,906 individuals that underwent a bone marrow aspiration or biopsy or lymph node biopsy without receiving a diagnosis of any malignancy ("biopsied individuals"), compared to individuals without such experience (i.e., reference).

Results: There was a higher rate of cardiovascular diseases during the diagnostic workup of patients with hematological malignancy (overall IRR, 3.3; 95% CI, 2.9 to 3.8; greatest IRR for embolism and thrombosis, 8.1; 95% CI, 5.2 to 12.8) and biopsied individuals (overall IRR, 4.9; 95% CI, 4.6 to 5.3; greatest IRR for stroke, 37.5; 95% CI, 34.1 to 41.2), compared to reference. Similarly, there was a higher rate of psychiatric disorders during the diagnostic workup of patients with hematological malignancy (IRR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.5 to 2.8) and biopsied individuals (IRR, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.9 to 3.4). The rate increases were greater around the time of diagnosis or biopsy, compared to thereafter, for both outcomes.

Conclusion: There were higher rates of cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric disorders during the diagnostic workup of a suspected hematological malignancy, regardless of the final diagnosis.

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author
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Epidemiology
volume
11
pages
10 pages
publisher
Dove Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:31819656
  • scopus:85078098968
ISSN
1179-1349
DOI
10.2147/CLEP.S218063
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
© 2019 Liu et al.
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6df098f7-7fe6-4855-a066-e8f4842530c8
date added to LUP
2019-12-16 12:42:21
date last changed
2020-03-03 10:08:24
@article{6df098f7-7fe6-4855-a066-e8f4842530c8,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Little attention has been given to the risk of cardiovascular and psychiatric comorbidities during the clinical evaluation of a suspected hematological malignancy.</p><p>Methods: Based on Skåne Healthcare Register, we performed a population-based cohort study of 1,527,449 individuals residing during 2005-2014 in Skåne, Sweden. We calculated the incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of cardiovascular diseases or psychiatric disorders during the diagnostic workup of 5495 patients with hematological malignancy and 18,906 individuals that underwent a bone marrow aspiration or biopsy or lymph node biopsy without receiving a diagnosis of any malignancy ("biopsied individuals"), compared to individuals without such experience (i.e., reference).</p><p>Results: There was a higher rate of cardiovascular diseases during the diagnostic workup of patients with hematological malignancy (overall IRR, 3.3; 95% CI, 2.9 to 3.8; greatest IRR for embolism and thrombosis, 8.1; 95% CI, 5.2 to 12.8) and biopsied individuals (overall IRR, 4.9; 95% CI, 4.6 to 5.3; greatest IRR for stroke, 37.5; 95% CI, 34.1 to 41.2), compared to reference. Similarly, there was a higher rate of psychiatric disorders during the diagnostic workup of patients with hematological malignancy (IRR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.5 to 2.8) and biopsied individuals (IRR, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.9 to 3.4). The rate increases were greater around the time of diagnosis or biopsy, compared to thereafter, for both outcomes.</p><p>Conclusion: There were higher rates of cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric disorders during the diagnostic workup of a suspected hematological malignancy, regardless of the final diagnosis.</p>},
  author       = {Liu, Qianwei and Andersson, Therese Ml and Jöud, Anna and Shen, Qing and Schelin, Maria Ec and Magnusson, Patrik Ke and Smedby, Karin E and Fang, Fang},
  issn         = {1179-1349},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1025--1034},
  publisher    = {Dove Press},
  series       = {Clinical Epidemiology},
  title        = {Cardiovascular Diseases And Psychiatric Disorders During The Diagnostic Workup Of Suspected Hematological Malignancy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CLEP.S218063},
  doi          = {10.2147/CLEP.S218063},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2019},
}