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Blood Perfusion of Human Upper Eyelid Skin Flaps Is Better in Myocutaneous than in Cutaneous Flaps

Berggren, Johanna V LU ; Tenland, Kajsa LU ; Bunke, Josefine LU ; Albinsson, John LU ; Hult, Jenny LU ; Merdasa, Aboma LU ; Sheikh, Rafi LU orcid ; Lindstedt, Sandra LU and Malmsjö, Malin LU (2022) In Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 38(2). p.166-169
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to monitor blood perfusion in human upper eyelid skin flaps and examine how the perfusion is affected by the thickness of the flap.

METHODS: Twenty upper eyelids were dissected as part of a blepharoplasty procedure in patients. The medial end of the blepharoplasty flap remained attached to mimic a flap design often used in reconstruction in the periocular area, a myocutaneous flap in which the blood supply follows the fibers of the orbicularis muscle and is thus parallel to the long axis of the flap. The muscle was thereafter dissected from the flap to create a cutaneous flap. Blood perfusion in the 2 types of flaps was compared using laser speckle contrast imaging.

RESULTS: Blood... (More)

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to monitor blood perfusion in human upper eyelid skin flaps and examine how the perfusion is affected by the thickness of the flap.

METHODS: Twenty upper eyelids were dissected as part of a blepharoplasty procedure in patients. The medial end of the blepharoplasty flap remained attached to mimic a flap design often used in reconstruction in the periocular area, a myocutaneous flap in which the blood supply follows the fibers of the orbicularis muscle and is thus parallel to the long axis of the flap. The muscle was thereafter dissected from the flap to create a cutaneous flap. Blood perfusion in the 2 types of flaps was compared using laser speckle contrast imaging.

RESULTS: Blood perfusion decreased gradually from the base to the tip of all the flaps. Perfusion was significantly higher in the myocutaneous flaps than in the cutaneous flaps (p < 0.0004): 69% in the myocutaneous flaps and 43% in the cutaneous flaps, measured 5 mm from the base. Blood perfusion was preserved to a greater extent distally in the myocutaneous flaps (minimum value seen at 25 mm) than in the cutaneous flaps (minimum seen at 11 mm).

CONCLUSIONS: Blood perfusion was better preserved in myocutaneous flaps, including both skin and the orbicularis oculi muscle, than in cutaneous flaps. This may be of clinical interest in patients with poor microcirculation in which a long flap is required for reconstructive surgery.

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author
; ; ; ; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
volume
38
issue
2
pages
166 - 169
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:34293787
  • scopus:85125683177
ISSN
1537-2677
DOI
10.1097/IOP.0000000000002015
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
Copyright © 2021 by The American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc., All rights reserved.
id
71133c31-3737-486b-ba40-21367344ac91
date added to LUP
2021-11-26 09:20:06
date last changed
2022-06-22 01:54:10
@article{71133c31-3737-486b-ba40-21367344ac91,
  abstract     = {{<p>BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to monitor blood perfusion in human upper eyelid skin flaps and examine how the perfusion is affected by the thickness of the flap.</p><p>METHODS: Twenty upper eyelids were dissected as part of a blepharoplasty procedure in patients. The medial end of the blepharoplasty flap remained attached to mimic a flap design often used in reconstruction in the periocular area, a myocutaneous flap in which the blood supply follows the fibers of the orbicularis muscle and is thus parallel to the long axis of the flap. The muscle was thereafter dissected from the flap to create a cutaneous flap. Blood perfusion in the 2 types of flaps was compared using laser speckle contrast imaging.</p><p>RESULTS: Blood perfusion decreased gradually from the base to the tip of all the flaps. Perfusion was significantly higher in the myocutaneous flaps than in the cutaneous flaps (p &lt; 0.0004): 69% in the myocutaneous flaps and 43% in the cutaneous flaps, measured 5 mm from the base. Blood perfusion was preserved to a greater extent distally in the myocutaneous flaps (minimum value seen at 25 mm) than in the cutaneous flaps (minimum seen at 11 mm).</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Blood perfusion was better preserved in myocutaneous flaps, including both skin and the orbicularis oculi muscle, than in cutaneous flaps. This may be of clinical interest in patients with poor microcirculation in which a long flap is required for reconstructive surgery.</p>}},
  author       = {{Berggren, Johanna V and Tenland, Kajsa and Bunke, Josefine and Albinsson, John and Hult, Jenny and Merdasa, Aboma and Sheikh, Rafi and Lindstedt, Sandra and Malmsjö, Malin}},
  issn         = {{1537-2677}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{2}},
  pages        = {{166--169}},
  publisher    = {{Lippincott Williams & Wilkins}},
  series       = {{Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery}},
  title        = {{Blood Perfusion of Human Upper Eyelid Skin Flaps Is Better in Myocutaneous than in Cutaneous Flaps}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/IOP.0000000000002015}},
  doi          = {{10.1097/IOP.0000000000002015}},
  volume       = {{38}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}