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The time-course of visual threat processing: High trait anxious individuals eventually avert their gaze from angry faces

Rohner, Jean-Christophe LU (2002) In Cognition & Emotion 16(6). p.837-844
Abstract
Several experiments have shown that anxious individuals have an attentional bias towards threat cues. It is also known, however, that exposure to a subjectively threatening but relatively harmless stimulus tends to lead to a reduction in fear. Accordingly, some authors have hypothesised that high trait anxious individuals have a vigilant-avoidant pattern of visual attention to threatening stimuli. In the present study, 52 high trait anxious and 48 low trait anxious subjects were shown pairs of emotional faces, while their direction of gaze was continuously monitored. For 0-1000 ms, both groups were found to view angry faces more than happy faces. For 2000-3000 ms, however, only high trait anxious subjects averted their gaze from angry... (More)
Several experiments have shown that anxious individuals have an attentional bias towards threat cues. It is also known, however, that exposure to a subjectively threatening but relatively harmless stimulus tends to lead to a reduction in fear. Accordingly, some authors have hypothesised that high trait anxious individuals have a vigilant-avoidant pattern of visual attention to threatening stimuli. In the present study, 52 high trait anxious and 48 low trait anxious subjects were shown pairs of emotional faces, while their direction of gaze was continuously monitored. For 0-1000 ms, both groups were found to view angry faces more than happy faces. For 2000-3000 ms, however, only high trait anxious subjects averted their gaze from angry faces more than they did from happy faces. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cognition & Emotion
volume
16
issue
6
pages
837 - 844
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000178496900008
  • scopus:0036829102
ISSN
0269-9931
DOI
10.1080/02699930143000572
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a254cc89-aa14-48a3-887d-1ab461afdee4 (old id 715624)
date added to LUP
2008-01-02 14:54:06
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:50:16
@article{a254cc89-aa14-48a3-887d-1ab461afdee4,
  abstract     = {Several experiments have shown that anxious individuals have an attentional bias towards threat cues. It is also known, however, that exposure to a subjectively threatening but relatively harmless stimulus tends to lead to a reduction in fear. Accordingly, some authors have hypothesised that high trait anxious individuals have a vigilant-avoidant pattern of visual attention to threatening stimuli. In the present study, 52 high trait anxious and 48 low trait anxious subjects were shown pairs of emotional faces, while their direction of gaze was continuously monitored. For 0-1000 ms, both groups were found to view angry faces more than happy faces. For 2000-3000 ms, however, only high trait anxious subjects averted their gaze from angry faces more than they did from happy faces.},
  author       = {Rohner, Jean-Christophe},
  issn         = {0269-9931},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {837--844},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Cognition & Emotion},
  title        = {The time-course of visual threat processing: High trait anxious individuals eventually avert their gaze from angry faces},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699930143000572},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2002},
}