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Perceived ability to perform daily hand activities after stroke and associated factors : A cross-sectional study

Ekstrand, Elisabeth LU ; Rylander, Lars LU ; Lexell, Jan LU and Brogårdh, Christina LU (2016) In BMC Neurology 16(1).
Abstract

Background: Despite that disability of the upper extremity is common after stroke, there is limited knowledge how it influences self-perceived ability to perform daily hand activities. The aim of this study was to describe which daily hand activities that persons with mild to moderate impairments of the upper extremity after stroke perceive difficult to perform and to evaluate how several potential factors are associated with the self-perceived performance. Methods: Seventy-five persons (72% male) with mild to moderate impairments of the upper extremity after stroke (4 to 116months) participated. Self-perceived ability to perform daily hand activities was rated with the ABILHAND Questionnaire. The perceived ability to perform daily hand... (More)

Background: Despite that disability of the upper extremity is common after stroke, there is limited knowledge how it influences self-perceived ability to perform daily hand activities. The aim of this study was to describe which daily hand activities that persons with mild to moderate impairments of the upper extremity after stroke perceive difficult to perform and to evaluate how several potential factors are associated with the self-perceived performance. Methods: Seventy-five persons (72% male) with mild to moderate impairments of the upper extremity after stroke (4 to 116months) participated. Self-perceived ability to perform daily hand activities was rated with the ABILHAND Questionnaire. The perceived ability to perform daily hand activities and the potentially associated factors (age, gender, social and vocational situation, affected hand, upper extremity pain, spasticity, grip strength, somatosensation of the hand, manual dexterity, perceived participation and life satisfaction) were evaluated by linear regression models. Results: The activities that were perceived difficult or impossible for a majority of the participants were bimanual tasks that required fine manual dexterity of the more affected hand. The factor that had the strongest association with perceived ability to perform daily hand activities was dexterity (p<0.001), which together with perceived participation (p=0.002) explained 48% of the variance in the final multivariate model. Conclusion: Persons with mild to moderate impairments of the upper extremity after stroke perceive that bimanual activities requiring fine manual dexterity are the most difficult to perform. Dexterity and perceived participation are factors specifically important to consider in the rehabilitation of the upper extremity after stroke in order to improve the ability to use the hands in daily life.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Activities of daily living, Association, Cross-sectional study, Rehabilitation, Self report, Stroke, Upper extremity
in
BMC Neurology
volume
16
issue
1
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:84995802325
  • wos:000386726000001
ISSN
1471-2377
DOI
10.1186/s12883-016-0733-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
71842425-ffcd-406f-bec5-0c2799d575c7
date added to LUP
2016-12-05 09:00:46
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:41:49
@article{71842425-ffcd-406f-bec5-0c2799d575c7,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Despite that disability of the upper extremity is common after stroke, there is limited knowledge how it influences self-perceived ability to perform daily hand activities. The aim of this study was to describe which daily hand activities that persons with mild to moderate impairments of the upper extremity after stroke perceive difficult to perform and to evaluate how several potential factors are associated with the self-perceived performance. Methods: Seventy-five persons (72% male) with mild to moderate impairments of the upper extremity after stroke (4 to 116months) participated. Self-perceived ability to perform daily hand activities was rated with the ABILHAND Questionnaire. The perceived ability to perform daily hand activities and the potentially associated factors (age, gender, social and vocational situation, affected hand, upper extremity pain, spasticity, grip strength, somatosensation of the hand, manual dexterity, perceived participation and life satisfaction) were evaluated by linear regression models. Results: The activities that were perceived difficult or impossible for a majority of the participants were bimanual tasks that required fine manual dexterity of the more affected hand. The factor that had the strongest association with perceived ability to perform daily hand activities was dexterity (p&lt;0.001), which together with perceived participation (p=0.002) explained 48% of the variance in the final multivariate model. Conclusion: Persons with mild to moderate impairments of the upper extremity after stroke perceive that bimanual activities requiring fine manual dexterity are the most difficult to perform. Dexterity and perceived participation are factors specifically important to consider in the rehabilitation of the upper extremity after stroke in order to improve the ability to use the hands in daily life.</p>},
  articleno    = {208},
  author       = {Ekstrand, Elisabeth and Rylander, Lars and Lexell, Jan and Brogårdh, Christina},
  issn         = {1471-2377},
  keyword      = {Activities of daily living,Association,Cross-sectional study,Rehabilitation,Self report,Stroke,Upper extremity},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Neurology},
  title        = {Perceived ability to perform daily hand activities after stroke and associated factors : A cross-sectional study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12883-016-0733-x},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2016},
}