Advanced

Hydrological Climate Change Impact Assessment at Small and Large Scales: Key Messages from Recent Progress in Sweden

Olsson, Jonas ; Arheimer, Berit ; Borris, Matthias ; Donnelly, Chantal LU ; Foster, Kean LU ; Nikulin, G. ; Persson, Magnus LU ; Perttu, Anna-Maria ; B Uvo, Cintia LU and Viklander, Maria , et al. (2016) In Climate 4(3).
Abstract
Hydrological climate change impact assessment is generally performed by following a sequence of steps from global and regional climate modelling, through data tailoring (bias-adjustment and downscaling) and hydrological modelling, to analysis and impact assessment. This “climate-hydrology-assessment chain” has been developed with a primary focus on applicability to a medium-sized rural basin, which has been and still is the main type of domain investigated in this context. However, impact assessment is to an increasing degree being performed at scales smaller or larger than the medium-sized rural basin. Small-scale assessment includes e.g., impacts on solute transport and urban hydrology and large-scale assessment includes e.g., climate... (More)
Hydrological climate change impact assessment is generally performed by following a sequence of steps from global and regional climate modelling, through data tailoring (bias-adjustment and downscaling) and hydrological modelling, to analysis and impact assessment. This “climate-hydrology-assessment chain” has been developed with a primary focus on applicability to a medium-sized rural basin, which has been and still is the main type of domain investigated in this context. However, impact assessment is to an increasing degree being performed at scales smaller or larger than the medium-sized rural basin. Small-scale assessment includes e.g., impacts on solute transport and urban hydrology and large-scale assessment includes e.g., climate teleconnections and continental modelling. In both cases, additional complexity is introduced in the process and additional demands are placed on all components involved, i.e., climate and hydrology models, tailoring methods, assessment principles, and tools. In this paper we provide an overview of recent progress with respect to small- and large-scale hydrological climate change impact assessment. In addition, we wish to highlight some key issues that emerged as a consequence of the scale and that need further attention from now on. While we mainly use examples from work performed in Europe for illustration, the progress generally reflects the overall state of the art and the issues considered are of a generic character. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
, et al. (More)
(Less)
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
modelling, future hydrology, water quality, precipitation
in
Climate
volume
4
issue
3
article number
39
publisher
MDPI AG
external identifiers
  • scopus:85033724500
DOI
10.3390/cli4030039
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7254be99-71d3-45e9-a4f3-0fef4e73ad6b
date added to LUP
2018-05-30 15:36:45
date last changed
2020-01-13 00:44:28
@article{7254be99-71d3-45e9-a4f3-0fef4e73ad6b,
  abstract     = {Hydrological climate change impact assessment is generally performed by following a sequence of steps from global and regional climate modelling, through data tailoring (bias-adjustment and downscaling) and hydrological modelling, to analysis and impact assessment. This “climate-hydrology-assessment chain” has been developed with a primary focus on applicability to a medium-sized rural basin, which has been and still is the main type of domain investigated in this context. However, impact assessment is to an increasing degree being performed at scales smaller or larger than the medium-sized rural basin. Small-scale assessment includes e.g., impacts on solute transport and urban hydrology and large-scale assessment includes e.g., climate teleconnections and continental modelling. In both cases, additional complexity is introduced in the process and additional demands are placed on all components involved, i.e., climate and hydrology models, tailoring methods, assessment principles, and tools. In this paper we provide an overview of recent progress with respect to small- and large-scale hydrological climate change impact assessment. In addition, we wish to highlight some key issues that emerged as a consequence of the scale and that need further attention from now on. While we mainly use examples from work performed in Europe for illustration, the progress generally reflects the overall state of the art and the issues considered are of a generic character. },
  author       = {Olsson, Jonas and Arheimer, Berit and Borris, Matthias and Donnelly, Chantal and Foster, Kean and Nikulin, G. and Persson, Magnus and Perttu, Anna-Maria and B Uvo, Cintia and Viklander, Maria and Yang, Wei},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  publisher    = {MDPI AG},
  series       = {Climate},
  title        = {Hydrological Climate Change Impact Assessment at Small and Large Scales: Key Messages from Recent Progress in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cli4030039},
  doi          = {10.3390/cli4030039},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {2016},
}