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A 2.4-to-5.3GHz Dual-Core CMOS VCO with Concentric 8-Shaped Coils

Fanori, Luca LU ; Mattsson, Thomas and Andreani, Pietro LU (2014) IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC), 2014 In 2014 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference Digest of Technical Papers (ISSCC) 57. p.370-370
Abstract
Despite recent attempts to relax the phase-noise demands on voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) for cellular communications [1], mainstream radios require harmonic VCOs capable of a very low phase noise with moderate power consumption, associated to a large tuning range (TR) and a high insensitivity to interfering signals. Ideally, the TR should be in excess of one octave, since this allows the easy synthesis of all frequencies below those directly generated by the VCOs via repeated frequency divisions by 2. At the same time, the oscillation spectrum should be affected as little as possible by spurious (common-mode) magnetic fields impinging on the inductor coil in the VCO tank. This is a crucial requirement in modern radios, where there... (More)
Despite recent attempts to relax the phase-noise demands on voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) for cellular communications [1], mainstream radios require harmonic VCOs capable of a very low phase noise with moderate power consumption, associated to a large tuning range (TR) and a high insensitivity to interfering signals. Ideally, the TR should be in excess of one octave, since this allows the easy synthesis of all frequencies below those directly generated by the VCOs via repeated frequency divisions by 2. At the same time, the oscillation spectrum should be affected as little as possible by spurious (common-mode) magnetic fields impinging on the inductor coil in the VCO tank. This is a crucial requirement in modern radios, where there are more PLLs active at the same time, and particularly when (non-contiguous) carrier aggregation is implemented, since in this case the signal bands may be very close to each other. If an individual PLL is used for each band, the VCOs may oscillate very close to each other, or at frequencies that are harmonically related to each other, posing a very serious issue of mutual pulling through the respective magnetic field. And even if a single VCO is used [2], or two (or more) VCOs that are not harmonically related [3], it is nevertheless a good practice to design the tank inductor as insensitive as possible to external magnetic fields, which abound in and close to the radio IC. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
2014 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference Digest of Technical Papers (ISSCC)
volume
57
pages
370 - 370
publisher
IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
conference name
IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC), 2014
external identifiers
  • wos:000353615000152
  • scopus:84898062951
ISSN
0193-6530
ISBN
978-1-4799-0918-6
DOI
10.1109/ISSCC.2014.6757474
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8d961aed-791c-4f27-ae4a-6f44dc7984b4 (old id 7424930)
date added to LUP
2015-06-26 07:50:38
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:48:12
@inproceedings{8d961aed-791c-4f27-ae4a-6f44dc7984b4,
  abstract     = {Despite recent attempts to relax the phase-noise demands on voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) for cellular communications [1], mainstream radios require harmonic VCOs capable of a very low phase noise with moderate power consumption, associated to a large tuning range (TR) and a high insensitivity to interfering signals. Ideally, the TR should be in excess of one octave, since this allows the easy synthesis of all frequencies below those directly generated by the VCOs via repeated frequency divisions by 2. At the same time, the oscillation spectrum should be affected as little as possible by spurious (common-mode) magnetic fields impinging on the inductor coil in the VCO tank. This is a crucial requirement in modern radios, where there are more PLLs active at the same time, and particularly when (non-contiguous) carrier aggregation is implemented, since in this case the signal bands may be very close to each other. If an individual PLL is used for each band, the VCOs may oscillate very close to each other, or at frequencies that are harmonically related to each other, posing a very serious issue of mutual pulling through the respective magnetic field. And even if a single VCO is used [2], or two (or more) VCOs that are not harmonically related [3], it is nevertheless a good practice to design the tank inductor as insensitive as possible to external magnetic fields, which abound in and close to the radio IC.},
  author       = {Fanori, Luca and Mattsson, Thomas and Andreani, Pietro},
  booktitle    = {2014 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference Digest of Technical Papers (ISSCC)},
  isbn         = {978-1-4799-0918-6},
  issn         = {0193-6530},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {370--370},
  publisher    = {IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.},
  title        = {A 2.4-to-5.3GHz Dual-Core CMOS VCO with Concentric 8-Shaped Coils},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ISSCC.2014.6757474},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2014},
}