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T. S. Eliot, Emotion and the Reader

Thormählen, Marianne LU (2015) In English Studies 96(4). p.444-457
Abstract
From the mid-1990s onwards, the humanities and social sciences have devoted a great deal of attention to the operations of the affects, and there has been much talk about "the affective turn". This article begins by looking at the impact of that phenomenon on scholarly and critical work on T. S. Eliot, a milder impact than one might have expected. It then goes on to investigate the interplay of emotion and intellect in the creation of Eliot's works, affective effects on readers of literature and the role of the academic writer/teacher in the context of emotional engagement with literary texts. The contention of cognitive scientists that emotion and thought do not occupy distinct cerebral spheres is seen as a liberating factor, and the... (More)
From the mid-1990s onwards, the humanities and social sciences have devoted a great deal of attention to the operations of the affects, and there has been much talk about "the affective turn". This article begins by looking at the impact of that phenomenon on scholarly and critical work on T. S. Eliot, a milder impact than one might have expected. It then goes on to investigate the interplay of emotion and intellect in the creation of Eliot's works, affective effects on readers of literature and the role of the academic writer/teacher in the context of emotional engagement with literary texts. The contention of cognitive scientists that emotion and thought do not occupy distinct cerebral spheres is seen as a liberating factor, and the author argues that the admission of affective dimensions to a pursuit traditionally dominated by intellectuality contributes to making the present time a propitious one for innovative Eliot criticism. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
English Studies
volume
96
issue
4
pages
444 - 457
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000353468900005
  • scopus:84928557015
ISSN
1744-4217
DOI
10.1080/0013838X.2015.1011895
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
862cb221-6510-4d3d-8ff0-4749dbcd63a5 (old id 7432967)
date added to LUP
2015-06-23 15:29:06
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:46:14
@article{862cb221-6510-4d3d-8ff0-4749dbcd63a5,
  abstract     = {From the mid-1990s onwards, the humanities and social sciences have devoted a great deal of attention to the operations of the affects, and there has been much talk about "the affective turn". This article begins by looking at the impact of that phenomenon on scholarly and critical work on T. S. Eliot, a milder impact than one might have expected. It then goes on to investigate the interplay of emotion and intellect in the creation of Eliot's works, affective effects on readers of literature and the role of the academic writer/teacher in the context of emotional engagement with literary texts. The contention of cognitive scientists that emotion and thought do not occupy distinct cerebral spheres is seen as a liberating factor, and the author argues that the admission of affective dimensions to a pursuit traditionally dominated by intellectuality contributes to making the present time a propitious one for innovative Eliot criticism.},
  author       = {Thormählen, Marianne},
  issn         = {1744-4217},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {444--457},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {English Studies},
  title        = {T. S. Eliot, Emotion and the Reader},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0013838X.2015.1011895},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2015},
}