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Vowel-related tongue movements in speech: Straight or curved paths? (L).

Löfqvist, Anders LU (2011) In The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 129(3). p.1149-1152
Abstract
This paper examines tongue movements between the two vowels in sequences of vowel-labial consonant-vowel, addressing the question whether the movement is a straight line or a curved path. Native speakers of Japanese and Italian served as subjects. The linguistic material consisted of words where the bilabial consonant was either long or short. The inclusion of words with different consonant lengths was motivated by earlier findings that the tongue movement is often longer when the consonant is long, which may be due to a more curved movement path. Tongue movements were recorded using a three-transmitter magnetometer system. To assess the movement path, the movement magnitude was calculated in two ways, as a straight line, the Euclidean... (More)
This paper examines tongue movements between the two vowels in sequences of vowel-labial consonant-vowel, addressing the question whether the movement is a straight line or a curved path. Native speakers of Japanese and Italian served as subjects. The linguistic material consisted of words where the bilabial consonant was either long or short. The inclusion of words with different consonant lengths was motivated by earlier findings that the tongue movement is often longer when the consonant is long, which may be due to a more curved movement path. Tongue movements were recorded using a three-transmitter magnetometer system. To assess the movement path, the movement magnitude was calculated in two ways, as a straight line, the Euclidean distance, and as the actual path, obtained by summing the individual Euclidean distances between successive samples from movement onset to offset. The ratio between the path and the Euclidean distance is 1 when the movement is a straight line and greater than 1 when the path is curved. Results show that in virtually all 21 cases examined the ratio was very close to 1 and in most cases 1.2 or less. There was no reliable influence of consonant length on the ratio. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
volume
129
issue
3
pages
1149 - 1152
publisher
American Institute of Physics
external identifiers
  • wos:000289007000009
  • pmid:21428476
  • scopus:79953043493
ISSN
1520-8524
DOI
10.1121/1.3533722
project
Cognition, Communication and Learning
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7452ba43-d523-46f1-87ae-ee35d43284c1 (old id 1883592)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21428476?dopt=Abstract
http://asadl.org/jasa/resource/1/jasman/v129/i3/p1149_s1
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3078025/
date added to LUP
2011-04-01 20:37:11
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:51:41
@article{7452ba43-d523-46f1-87ae-ee35d43284c1,
  abstract     = {This paper examines tongue movements between the two vowels in sequences of vowel-labial consonant-vowel, addressing the question whether the movement is a straight line or a curved path. Native speakers of Japanese and Italian served as subjects. The linguistic material consisted of words where the bilabial consonant was either long or short. The inclusion of words with different consonant lengths was motivated by earlier findings that the tongue movement is often longer when the consonant is long, which may be due to a more curved movement path. Tongue movements were recorded using a three-transmitter magnetometer system. To assess the movement path, the movement magnitude was calculated in two ways, as a straight line, the Euclidean distance, and as the actual path, obtained by summing the individual Euclidean distances between successive samples from movement onset to offset. The ratio between the path and the Euclidean distance is 1 when the movement is a straight line and greater than 1 when the path is curved. Results show that in virtually all 21 cases examined the ratio was very close to 1 and in most cases 1.2 or less. There was no reliable influence of consonant length on the ratio.},
  author       = {Löfqvist, Anders},
  issn         = {1520-8524},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1149--1152},
  publisher    = {American Institute of Physics},
  series       = {The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
  title        = {Vowel-related tongue movements in speech: Straight or curved paths? (L).},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.3533722},
  volume       = {129},
  year         = {2011},
}