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The neurophenomenology of hypnosis

Cardeña, Etzel LU ; Lehmann, Dietrich; Jönsson, Peter LU and Terhune, Devin LU (2007) 50th Annual Conventions of the Parapsychological Association In Proceedings of the 50th Annual Conventions of the Parapsychological Association p.17-30
Abstract
From its inception, “animal magnetism” and hypnosis have been related to reputed psi phenomena. However, only until recently have phenomenological and neurophysiological approaches advanced enough to go beyond a putative –and vague- hypnotic state. In this study we are following a neurophenomenological approach by analyzing in parallel experience and brain processes. We selected a group of individuals with high, medium, and low hypnotizability. While their cortical activity was evaluated, their responses to a baseline sitting down with eyes closed and then lifting an arm was compared to the same behaviors after a hypnotic induction (1st session); their spontaneous mentation during baseline and various prompts after an induction and a... (More)
From its inception, “animal magnetism” and hypnosis have been related to reputed psi phenomena. However, only until recently have phenomenological and neurophysiological approaches advanced enough to go beyond a putative –and vague- hypnotic state. In this study we are following a neurophenomenological approach by analyzing in parallel experience and brain processes. We selected a group of individuals with high, medium, and low hypnotizability. While their cortical activity was evaluated, their responses to a baseline sitting down with eyes closed and then lifting an arm was compared to the same behaviors after a hypnotic induction (1st session); their spontaneous mentation during baseline and various prompts after an induction and a suggestion to go into their “deepest” state was also measured (2nd session). Results show that a between-subjects factor (level of hypnotizabity) and a within subject factor (baseline or other stages of the session) both had significant effects, as did their interaction. While the experience of low hypnotizables was characterized by “normal” mentation, that of “medium” hypnotizables was centered more on vestibular and other bodily sensations, and that of “highs” was characterized by positive affect and “exceptional” mystic-like phenomena. Spectral and source location EEG analyses corroborated various patterns of brain functioning differences across levels of hypnotizability and at different times during the sessions. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hypnosis, phenomenology, EEG
in
Proceedings of the 50th Annual Conventions of the Parapsychological Association
pages
17 - 30
publisher
The Parapsychological Association
conference name
50th Annual Conventions of the Parapsychological Association
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b5c205d3-8dba-4c40-b505-9d1a1ceaa88c (old id 749162)
date added to LUP
2007-12-20 13:07:52
date last changed
2016-04-16 09:33:57
@inproceedings{b5c205d3-8dba-4c40-b505-9d1a1ceaa88c,
  abstract     = {From its inception, “animal magnetism” and hypnosis have been related to reputed psi phenomena. However, only until recently have phenomenological and neurophysiological approaches advanced enough to go beyond a putative –and vague- hypnotic state. In this study we are following a neurophenomenological approach by analyzing in parallel experience and brain processes. We selected a group of individuals with high, medium, and low hypnotizability. While their cortical activity was evaluated, their responses to a baseline sitting down with eyes closed and then lifting an arm was compared to the same behaviors after a hypnotic induction (1st session); their spontaneous mentation during baseline and various prompts after an induction and a suggestion to go into their “deepest” state was also measured (2nd session). Results show that a between-subjects factor (level of hypnotizabity) and a within subject factor (baseline or other stages of the session) both had significant effects, as did their interaction. While the experience of low hypnotizables was characterized by “normal” mentation, that of “medium” hypnotizables was centered more on vestibular and other bodily sensations, and that of “highs” was characterized by positive affect and “exceptional” mystic-like phenomena. Spectral and source location EEG analyses corroborated various patterns of brain functioning differences across levels of hypnotizability and at different times during the sessions.},
  author       = {Cardeña, Etzel and Lehmann, Dietrich and Jönsson, Peter and Terhune, Devin},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 50th Annual Conventions of the Parapsychological Association},
  keyword      = {hypnosis,phenomenology,EEG},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {17--30},
  publisher    = {The Parapsychological Association},
  title        = {The neurophenomenology of hypnosis},
  year         = {2007},
}