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A Swedish national adoption study of risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Waehrens, Rasmus LU ; Zöller, Bengt LU orcid ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Pirouzifard, MirNabi LU (2017) In BMJ open gastroenterology 4(1). p.000156-000156
Abstract

Objectives: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) clusters in families, but the familial risk of IBS has not been determined in adoptees. Studying adoptees and their biological and adoptive parents is a strong study design for separating genetic from environmental causes of familial clustering. This nationwide study aimed to separate the biological (genetic) and familial environmental contribution to the familial transmission of IBS.

Methods: We performed a family study for Swedish-born adoptees born from 1951 until 1995, and their biological and adoptive parents. The Swedish Multigeneration Register was linked to the Hospital Register (inpatients and outpatients) for the period 1964-2012 and the Swedish Outpatient Care Register for... (More)

Objectives: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) clusters in families, but the familial risk of IBS has not been determined in adoptees. Studying adoptees and their biological and adoptive parents is a strong study design for separating genetic from environmental causes of familial clustering. This nationwide study aimed to separate the biological (genetic) and familial environmental contribution to the familial transmission of IBS.

Methods: We performed a family study for Swedish-born adoptees born from 1951 until 1995, and their biological and adoptive parents. The Swedish Multigeneration Register was linked to the Hospital Register (inpatients and outpatients) for the period 1964-2012 and the Swedish Outpatient Care Register for 2001-2012, and the Swedish Primary Healthcare register for 1989-2012. ORs for IBS were calculated for adoptees with an affected biological parent with IBS compared with adoptees without a biological parent with IBS. The OR for IBS was also determined in adoptees with an adoptive parent with IBS compared with adoptees without an adoptive parent with IBS. Heritability h2 (±SE) was also determined.

Results: The ORs for IBS were 1.67 in adoptees (95% CI 1.06 to 2.62) of biological parents diagnosed with IBS. The ORs for IBS were 0.88 in adoptees (95% CI 0.48 to 1.63) of adoptive parents diagnosed with IBS. The heritability was 19.5%±8.5%.

Conclusions: The present study indicates that biological (genetic) factors are important for the familial clustering of IBS. The heritability calculated is in the range from twin studies and suggests that heritability may be estimated in adoptees.

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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Journal Article, irritable bowel syndrome
in
BMJ open gastroenterology
volume
4
issue
1
pages
000156 - 000156
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:29119001
  • scopus:85051098540
ISSN
2054-4774
DOI
10.1136/bmjgast-2017-000156
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
irriterat tarm ärftlighet adoption
id
74a96d49-e70c-4d60-b8c2-5ae3ac7bcba4
date added to LUP
2018-04-28 00:00:07
date last changed
2022-05-03 02:57:09
@article{74a96d49-e70c-4d60-b8c2-5ae3ac7bcba4,
  abstract     = {{<p>Objectives: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) clusters in families, but the familial risk of IBS has not been determined in adoptees. Studying adoptees and their biological and adoptive parents is a strong study design for separating genetic from environmental causes of familial clustering. This nationwide study aimed to separate the biological (genetic) and familial environmental contribution to the familial transmission of IBS.</p><p>Methods: We performed a family study for Swedish-born adoptees born from 1951 until 1995, and their biological and adoptive parents. The Swedish Multigeneration Register was linked to the Hospital Register (inpatients and outpatients) for the period 1964-2012 and the Swedish Outpatient Care Register for 2001-2012, and the Swedish Primary Healthcare register for 1989-2012. ORs for IBS were calculated for adoptees with an affected biological parent with IBS compared with adoptees without a biological parent with IBS. The OR for IBS was also determined in adoptees with an adoptive parent with IBS compared with adoptees without an adoptive parent with IBS. Heritability h2 (±SE) was also determined.</p><p>Results: The ORs for IBS were 1.67 in adoptees (95% CI 1.06 to 2.62) of biological parents diagnosed with IBS. The ORs for IBS were 0.88 in adoptees (95% CI 0.48 to 1.63) of adoptive parents diagnosed with IBS. The heritability was 19.5%±8.5%.</p><p>Conclusions: The present study indicates that biological (genetic) factors are important for the familial clustering of IBS. The heritability calculated is in the range from twin studies and suggests that heritability may be estimated in adoptees.</p>}},
  author       = {{Waehrens, Rasmus and Zöller, Bengt and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina and Pirouzifard, MirNabi}},
  issn         = {{2054-4774}},
  keywords     = {{Journal Article; irritable bowel syndrome}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{000156--000156}},
  publisher    = {{BMJ Publishing Group}},
  series       = {{BMJ open gastroenterology}},
  title        = {{A Swedish national adoption study of risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjgast-2017-000156}},
  doi          = {{10.1136/bmjgast-2017-000156}},
  volume       = {{4}},
  year         = {{2017}},
}