Advanced

The effect of pelvic floor muscle training on sexual function in men with lower urinary tract symptoms after stroke

Tibaek, S.; Gard, Gunvor LU ; Dehlendorff, C.; Iversen, H. K.; Erdal, J.; Biering-Sorensen, F.; Dorey, G. and Jensen, R. (2015) In Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation 22(3). p.185-193
Abstract
Background: Erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common sequelae in men after stroke. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on measured erectile function as an indicator of sexuality in men with LUTS after stroke. Method: A sample of 516 men with stroke was invited to participate in this single-blinded, randomized controlled trial according to in- and exclusion criteria. This resulted in 31 participants who were randomized to either a Treatment Group (n=16) or a Control Group (n=15). The intervention included 12weeks of PFMT. The effect was measured on the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. Results: Thirty... (More)
Background: Erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common sequelae in men after stroke. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on measured erectile function as an indicator of sexuality in men with LUTS after stroke. Method: A sample of 516 men with stroke was invited to participate in this single-blinded, randomized controlled trial according to in- and exclusion criteria. This resulted in 31 participants who were randomized to either a Treatment Group (n=16) or a Control Group (n=15). The intervention included 12weeks of PFMT. The effect was measured on the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. Results: Thirty participants (median age: 68 years; interquartile range: 60-74 years) completed the study, 15 in each group. The results of the IIEF-5 sum score showed a significant improvement (P<0.04) from pre-test to post-test in the Treatment Group, but not in the Control Group. Within pre-test and 6-month follow-up, the median sum score decreased in both groups, worsened in the Control Group [ Treatment Group, 3 (17%) versus Control Group, 5 (31%)]. There were differences between the groups at post-test and at follow-up, but they were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The results showed that, as measured by erectile function in men with LUTS after stroke, PFMT may have short-term and long-term effect, although no statistically significant effect was demonstrated between the groups. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Erectile function, LUTS, Men, Pelvic floor muscle training, Stroke
in
Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation
volume
22
issue
3
pages
185 - 193
publisher
Maney Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000356578900004
  • scopus:84949994671
ISSN
1074-9357
DOI
10.1179/1074935714Z.0000000019
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f331f5b1-1ade-483f-9235-119ba97dcc86 (old id 7593545)
date added to LUP
2015-08-03 10:09:25
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:55:28
@article{f331f5b1-1ade-483f-9235-119ba97dcc86,
  abstract     = {Background: Erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common sequelae in men after stroke. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on measured erectile function as an indicator of sexuality in men with LUTS after stroke. Method: A sample of 516 men with stroke was invited to participate in this single-blinded, randomized controlled trial according to in- and exclusion criteria. This resulted in 31 participants who were randomized to either a Treatment Group (n=16) or a Control Group (n=15). The intervention included 12weeks of PFMT. The effect was measured on the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. Results: Thirty participants (median age: 68 years; interquartile range: 60-74 years) completed the study, 15 in each group. The results of the IIEF-5 sum score showed a significant improvement (P&lt;0.04) from pre-test to post-test in the Treatment Group, but not in the Control Group. Within pre-test and 6-month follow-up, the median sum score decreased in both groups, worsened in the Control Group [ Treatment Group, 3 (17%) versus Control Group, 5 (31%)]. There were differences between the groups at post-test and at follow-up, but they were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The results showed that, as measured by erectile function in men with LUTS after stroke, PFMT may have short-term and long-term effect, although no statistically significant effect was demonstrated between the groups.},
  author       = {Tibaek, S. and Gard, Gunvor and Dehlendorff, C. and Iversen, H. K. and Erdal, J. and Biering-Sorensen, F. and Dorey, G. and Jensen, R.},
  issn         = {1074-9357},
  keyword      = {Erectile function,LUTS,Men,Pelvic floor muscle training,Stroke},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {185--193},
  publisher    = {Maney Publishing},
  series       = {Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation},
  title        = {The effect of pelvic floor muscle training on sexual function in men with lower urinary tract symptoms after stroke},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1074935714Z.0000000019},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2015},
}