Advanced

Rural avenues as dispersal corridors for the vulnerable saproxylic beetle Elater ferrugineus in a fragmented agricultural landscape

Oleksa, Andrzej; Chybicki, Igor J.; Larsson, Mattias C.; Svensson, Glenn LU and Gawronski, Robert (2015) In Journal of Insect Conservation 19(3). p.567-580
Abstract
Understanding factors that limit gene flow through the landscape is crucial for conservation of organisms living in fragmented habitats. We analysed patterns of gene flow in Elater ferrugineus, an endangered click beetle living in old-growth, hollow trees in a network of rural avenues surrounded by inhospitable arable land. Using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) data, we aimed to evaluate if the landscape features important for the beetle's development are also important for its dispersal. By dividing the sampling area into 30 x 30 m cells, with each cell categorised into one of four classes according to its putative permeability for dispersing beetles, and by correlating matrices of genetic and landscape resistance distances,... (More)
Understanding factors that limit gene flow through the landscape is crucial for conservation of organisms living in fragmented habitats. We analysed patterns of gene flow in Elater ferrugineus, an endangered click beetle living in old-growth, hollow trees in a network of rural avenues surrounded by inhospitable arable land. Using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) data, we aimed to evaluate if the landscape features important for the beetle's development are also important for its dispersal. By dividing the sampling area into 30 x 30 m cells, with each cell categorised into one of four classes according to its putative permeability for dispersing beetles, and by correlating matrices of genetic and landscape resistance distances, we evaluated which of the landscape models had the best fit with the observed kinship structure. Significant correlations between genetic and Euclidean distances were detected, which indicated that restricted dispersal is the main constraint driving differentiation between populations of E. ferrugineus. Out of 81 landscape models in total, 54 models yielded significantly weaker correlation between matrices of pairwise kinship and effective distances than the null model. Regression analysis pointed to avenues as having the highest and positive impact on the concordance between matrices of kinship and landscape distances, while open arable land had the opposite effect. Our study thus shows that tree avenues can function as efficient dispersal corridors for E. ferrugineus, highlighting the importance of saving such avenues to increase the connectivity among suitable habitat patches, thereby reducing the risk of local extinctions of E. ferrugineus as well as other saproxylic organisms. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Isolation-by-resistance, Isolation-by-distance, Gene flow, Landscape, genetics, Spatial genetic structure
in
Journal of Insect Conservation
volume
19
issue
3
pages
567 - 580
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000356161600014
  • scopus:84930930118
ISSN
1366-638X
DOI
10.1007/s10841-015-9778-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3d974b54-850b-427a-8b69-849ab6b87377 (old id 7601774)
date added to LUP
2015-07-23 13:52:54
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:01:03
@article{3d974b54-850b-427a-8b69-849ab6b87377,
  abstract     = {Understanding factors that limit gene flow through the landscape is crucial for conservation of organisms living in fragmented habitats. We analysed patterns of gene flow in Elater ferrugineus, an endangered click beetle living in old-growth, hollow trees in a network of rural avenues surrounded by inhospitable arable land. Using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) data, we aimed to evaluate if the landscape features important for the beetle's development are also important for its dispersal. By dividing the sampling area into 30 x 30 m cells, with each cell categorised into one of four classes according to its putative permeability for dispersing beetles, and by correlating matrices of genetic and landscape resistance distances, we evaluated which of the landscape models had the best fit with the observed kinship structure. Significant correlations between genetic and Euclidean distances were detected, which indicated that restricted dispersal is the main constraint driving differentiation between populations of E. ferrugineus. Out of 81 landscape models in total, 54 models yielded significantly weaker correlation between matrices of pairwise kinship and effective distances than the null model. Regression analysis pointed to avenues as having the highest and positive impact on the concordance between matrices of kinship and landscape distances, while open arable land had the opposite effect. Our study thus shows that tree avenues can function as efficient dispersal corridors for E. ferrugineus, highlighting the importance of saving such avenues to increase the connectivity among suitable habitat patches, thereby reducing the risk of local extinctions of E. ferrugineus as well as other saproxylic organisms.},
  author       = {Oleksa, Andrzej and Chybicki, Igor J. and Larsson, Mattias C. and Svensson, Glenn and Gawronski, Robert},
  issn         = {1366-638X},
  keyword      = {Isolation-by-resistance,Isolation-by-distance,Gene flow,Landscape,genetics,Spatial genetic structure},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {567--580},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Insect Conservation},
  title        = {Rural avenues as dispersal corridors for the vulnerable saproxylic beetle <i>Elater ferrugineus</i> in a fragmented agricultural landscape},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10841-015-9778-1},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2015},
}