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High-fat diet consumption alters energy metabolism in the mouse hypothalamus

Lizarbe, Blanca ; Cherix, Antoine ; Duarte, João M.N. LU ; Cardinaux, Jean René and Gruetter, Rolf (2019) In International Journal of Obesity 43(6). p.1295-1304
Abstract

Background/Objectives: High-fat diet consumption is known to trigger an inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, which has been characterized by an initial expression of pro-inflammatory genes followed by hypothalamic astrocytosis, microgliosis, and the appearance of neuronal injury markers. The specific effects of high-fat diet on hypothalamic energy metabolism and neurotransmission are however not yet known and have not been investigated before. Subjects/Methods: We used 1H and 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and immunofluorescence techniques to evaluate in vivo the consequences of high-saturated fat diet administration to mice, and explored the effects on hypothalamic metabolism in three mouse... (More)

Background/Objectives: High-fat diet consumption is known to trigger an inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, which has been characterized by an initial expression of pro-inflammatory genes followed by hypothalamic astrocytosis, microgliosis, and the appearance of neuronal injury markers. The specific effects of high-fat diet on hypothalamic energy metabolism and neurotransmission are however not yet known and have not been investigated before. Subjects/Methods: We used 1H and 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and immunofluorescence techniques to evaluate in vivo the consequences of high-saturated fat diet administration to mice, and explored the effects on hypothalamic metabolism in three mouse cohorts at different time points for up to 4 months. Results: We found that high-fat diet increases significantly the hypothalamic levels of glucose (P < 0.001), osmolytes (P < 0.001), and neurotransmitters (P < 0.05) from 2 months of diet, and alters the rates of metabolic (P < 0.05) and neurotransmission fluxes (P < 0.001), and the contribution of non-glycolytic substrates to hypothalamic metabolism (P < 0.05) after 10 weeks of high-fat feeding. Conclusions/interpretation: We report changes that reveal a high-fat diet-induced alteration of hypothalamic metabolism and neurotransmission that is quantifiable by 1H and 13C MRS in vivo, and present the first evidence of the extension of the inflammation pathology to a localized metabolic imbalance.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Obesity
volume
43
issue
6
pages
1295 - 1304
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:85054616210
  • pmid:30301962
ISSN
0307-0565
DOI
10.1038/s41366-018-0224-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
76330b89-219c-43c5-8fb7-ba1669ed12ea
date added to LUP
2018-11-13 10:01:09
date last changed
2020-01-16 03:36:41
@article{76330b89-219c-43c5-8fb7-ba1669ed12ea,
  abstract     = {<p>Background/Objectives: High-fat diet consumption is known to trigger an inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, which has been characterized by an initial expression of pro-inflammatory genes followed by hypothalamic astrocytosis, microgliosis, and the appearance of neuronal injury markers. The specific effects of high-fat diet on hypothalamic energy metabolism and neurotransmission are however not yet known and have not been investigated before. Subjects/Methods: We used <sup>1</sup>H and <sup>13</sup>C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and immunofluorescence techniques to evaluate in vivo the consequences of high-saturated fat diet administration to mice, and explored the effects on hypothalamic metabolism in three mouse cohorts at different time points for up to 4 months. Results: We found that high-fat diet increases significantly the hypothalamic levels of glucose (P &lt; 0.001), osmolytes (P &lt; 0.001), and neurotransmitters (P &lt; 0.05) from 2 months of diet, and alters the rates of metabolic (P &lt; 0.05) and neurotransmission fluxes (P &lt; 0.001), and the contribution of non-glycolytic substrates to hypothalamic metabolism (P &lt; 0.05) after 10 weeks of high-fat feeding. Conclusions/interpretation: We report changes that reveal a high-fat diet-induced alteration of hypothalamic metabolism and neurotransmission that is quantifiable by <sup>1</sup>H and <sup>13</sup>C MRS in vivo, and present the first evidence of the extension of the inflammation pathology to a localized metabolic imbalance.</p>},
  author       = {Lizarbe, Blanca and Cherix, Antoine and Duarte, João M.N. and Cardinaux, Jean René and Gruetter, Rolf},
  issn         = {0307-0565},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1295--1304},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {International Journal of Obesity},
  title        = {High-fat diet consumption alters energy metabolism in the mouse hypothalamus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41366-018-0224-9},
  doi          = {10.1038/s41366-018-0224-9},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2019},
}