Advanced

Implicit associations and social anxiety

Westberg, Peter; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar LU and Jönsson, Peter LU (2007) In Cognitive Behaviour Therapy 36(1). p.43-51
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test whether an Implicit Association Test (IAT) with self- and social anxiety-words is sensitive to differences in trait social anxiety, and to an experimental induction of social anxiety. This was performed in the context of a partial replication of a previous study, in which Mauss et al. (2004) compared high and low trait socially anxious individuals before and after a social anxiety induction (an impromptu speech). Mauss et al.'s findings were replicated; that is, (i) the social anxiety induction produced increases in self-rated anxiety, self-rated physiological responses, and actual physiological arousal; and (ii) higher trait social anxiety was associated with stronger self-rated anxiety and stronger... (More)
The aim of this study was to test whether an Implicit Association Test (IAT) with self- and social anxiety-words is sensitive to differences in trait social anxiety, and to an experimental induction of social anxiety. This was performed in the context of a partial replication of a previous study, in which Mauss et al. (2004) compared high and low trait socially anxious individuals before and after a social anxiety induction (an impromptu speech). Mauss et al.'s findings were replicated; that is, (i) the social anxiety induction produced increases in self-rated anxiety, self-rated physiological responses, and actual physiological arousal; and (ii) higher trait social anxiety was associated with stronger self-rated anxiety and stronger self-rated physiological responses, but not with stronger actual physiological responses. In addition, the results showed higher IAT social anxiety scores, both (i) as a result of the social anxiety induction, and (ii) as a function of self-reported trait social anxiety. It is suggested that the IAT may be a useful method for the experimental study of automatic evaluational thought patterns. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cognitive processes, physiological activation, anxiety induction, social anxiety, implicit associations
in
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
volume
36
issue
1
pages
43 - 51
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:33947276898
ISSN
1651-2316
DOI
10.1080/08037060601020401
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7c748632-5a37-4082-be1e-33b35afde6f5 (old id 774948)
date added to LUP
2008-01-03 16:10:42
date last changed
2017-05-28 03:44:58
@article{7c748632-5a37-4082-be1e-33b35afde6f5,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to test whether an Implicit Association Test (IAT) with self- and social anxiety-words is sensitive to differences in trait social anxiety, and to an experimental induction of social anxiety. This was performed in the context of a partial replication of a previous study, in which Mauss et al. (2004) compared high and low trait socially anxious individuals before and after a social anxiety induction (an impromptu speech). Mauss et al.'s findings were replicated; that is, (i) the social anxiety induction produced increases in self-rated anxiety, self-rated physiological responses, and actual physiological arousal; and (ii) higher trait social anxiety was associated with stronger self-rated anxiety and stronger self-rated physiological responses, but not with stronger actual physiological responses. In addition, the results showed higher IAT social anxiety scores, both (i) as a result of the social anxiety induction, and (ii) as a function of self-reported trait social anxiety. It is suggested that the IAT may be a useful method for the experimental study of automatic evaluational thought patterns.},
  author       = {Westberg, Peter and Lundh, Lars-Gunnar and Jönsson, Peter},
  issn         = {1651-2316},
  keyword      = {cognitive processes,physiological activation,anxiety induction,social anxiety,implicit associations},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {43--51},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Cognitive Behaviour Therapy},
  title        = {Implicit associations and social anxiety},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08037060601020401},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2007},
}