Advanced

Catalytic Abatement of NH3 Using NOx in Reducing Environment

Malek, Laura LU ; Tunå, Per LU and Hulteberg, Christian LU (2015) In Topics in Catalysis 58(14-17). p.993-1001
Abstract
Removal of ammonia from synthesis gas is an important step in gas purification to prevent poisoning of downstream catalyst or formation of nitrogen oxides on combustion. This publication proposes that ammonia can be removed by using selective catalytic abatement with NOx, not unlike the selective catalytic reduction of NOx but under reducing environment. Two different catalysts have been used for the experiments; V2O5/WO3/TiO2 and H-mordenite. The conducted experiments were performed on a model synthesis gas and served to investigate the selectivity and to some extent the longevity of these catalysts under reducing atmosphere, and also the effect of water on the catalyst performance. A number of catalyst characterisation methods have been... (More)
Removal of ammonia from synthesis gas is an important step in gas purification to prevent poisoning of downstream catalyst or formation of nitrogen oxides on combustion. This publication proposes that ammonia can be removed by using selective catalytic abatement with NOx, not unlike the selective catalytic reduction of NOx but under reducing environment. Two different catalysts have been used for the experiments; V2O5/WO3/TiO2 and H-mordenite. The conducted experiments were performed on a model synthesis gas and served to investigate the selectivity and to some extent the longevity of these catalysts under reducing atmosphere, and also the effect of water on the catalyst performance. A number of catalyst characterisation methods have been used to obtain a better understanding of the catalyst morphology and surface. The methods that have been used are Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed desorption using ammonia. The initial performance with respect to conversion and selectivity is good for the vanadia-based catalyst, but it is not chemically stable. This is manifested by a change in the catalyst crystal structure suggesting an oxygen depletion of the titania support and decreased activity with time-on-stream. The mordenite catalyst is stable but the activity and selectivity, especially to avoid the formation of N2O, needs to be improved before implementation. Based on the experimental work performed, none of the catalysts in their present state are suitable for the proposed operating conditions. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Selective catalytic reduction NOx NH3 H-mordenite Vanadium Catalysts
in
Topics in Catalysis
volume
58
issue
14-17
pages
993 - 1001
publisher
Kluwer
external identifiers
  • wos:000362581900020
ISSN
1572-9028
DOI
10.1007/s11244-015-0468-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
868f0f7c-2678-483a-86ca-9d74de127744 (old id 7761882)
alternative location
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11244-015-0468-8?wt_mc=email.event.1.SEM.ArticleAuthorOnlineFirst
date added to LUP
2015-08-14 14:14:24
date last changed
2016-04-15 21:54:54
@article{868f0f7c-2678-483a-86ca-9d74de127744,
  abstract     = {Removal of ammonia from synthesis gas is an important step in gas purification to prevent poisoning of downstream catalyst or formation of nitrogen oxides on combustion. This publication proposes that ammonia can be removed by using selective catalytic abatement with NOx, not unlike the selective catalytic reduction of NOx but under reducing environment. Two different catalysts have been used for the experiments; V2O5/WO3/TiO2 and H-mordenite. The conducted experiments were performed on a model synthesis gas and served to investigate the selectivity and to some extent the longevity of these catalysts under reducing atmosphere, and also the effect of water on the catalyst performance. A number of catalyst characterisation methods have been used to obtain a better understanding of the catalyst morphology and surface. The methods that have been used are Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed desorption using ammonia. The initial performance with respect to conversion and selectivity is good for the vanadia-based catalyst, but it is not chemically stable. This is manifested by a change in the catalyst crystal structure suggesting an oxygen depletion of the titania support and decreased activity with time-on-stream. The mordenite catalyst is stable but the activity and selectivity, especially to avoid the formation of N2O, needs to be improved before implementation. Based on the experimental work performed, none of the catalysts in their present state are suitable for the proposed operating conditions.},
  author       = {Malek, Laura and Tunå, Per and Hulteberg, Christian},
  issn         = {1572-9028},
  keyword      = {Selective catalytic reduction NOx NH3 H-mordenite Vanadium Catalysts},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {14-17},
  pages        = {993--1001},
  publisher    = {Kluwer},
  series       = {Topics in Catalysis},
  title        = {Catalytic Abatement of NH3 Using NOx in Reducing Environment},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11244-015-0468-8},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2015},
}