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Concussion incidence and recovery in Swedish elite soccer - prolonged recovery in female players

Vedung, Fredrik ; Hänni, Sofie ; Tegner, Yelverton ; Johansson, Jakob and Marklund, Niklas LU (2020) In Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Sport-related concussions are an increasingly recognized health problem. Soccer is the most popular sport in the world although recent studies on concussion incidence are scarce. Here, a nation-wide prospective study on concussion incidence, symptom severity, risk factors, gender differences and return-to-play after concussion was performed in 51 Swedish elite soccer teams during the 2017 season.

METHODS: In the first and second soccer leagues for men and women, a Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) -based questionnaire study was performed at pre-season (baseline) and from 48h up to three months post-concussion.

RESULTS: We followed 959 players (389 women, 570 men) for 25146 player game hours (9867 h for... (More)

OBJECTIVES: Sport-related concussions are an increasingly recognized health problem. Soccer is the most popular sport in the world although recent studies on concussion incidence are scarce. Here, a nation-wide prospective study on concussion incidence, symptom severity, risk factors, gender differences and return-to-play after concussion was performed in 51 Swedish elite soccer teams during the 2017 season.

METHODS: In the first and second soccer leagues for men and women, a Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) -based questionnaire study was performed at pre-season (baseline) and from 48h up to three months post-concussion.

RESULTS: We followed 959 players (389 women, 570 men) for 25146 player game hours (9867 h for women, 15279 h for men). Concussion incidence (n= 36) was 1.19/1000 player game hours (females 1.22/1000 h, males 1.18/1000 h; p= 0.85). Twenty-seven percent (females 8%, males 40%) of players continued to play immediately after the concussion. When compared to male players, female players had worse initial symptom severity scores (median and IQR 30 (17-50.5) vs. 11 (4-26.25), p=0.02) and longer return to play (p=0.02). Risk factors for concussion were baseline symptoms and previous concussion.

CONCLUSION: In Swedish elite soccer, the concussion incidence was 1.19/1000 without gender differences. Most players recovered to play within four weeks post-injury. Almost one third of players continued to play at time of concussion. Female players had worse initial symptoms and longer return-to-play time than males, and a prolonged recovery beyond three months was only observed among female players.

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Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
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Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:32100894
  • scopus:85081752661
ISSN
1600-0838
DOI
10.1111/sms.13644
language
English
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yes
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This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
id
776cdcf9-0960-496e-a49e-902ac411a6d9
date added to LUP
2020-03-02 15:39:03
date last changed
2020-11-16 03:27:18
@article{776cdcf9-0960-496e-a49e-902ac411a6d9,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVES: Sport-related concussions are an increasingly recognized health problem. Soccer is the most popular sport in the world although recent studies on concussion incidence are scarce. Here, a nation-wide prospective study on concussion incidence, symptom severity, risk factors, gender differences and return-to-play after concussion was performed in 51 Swedish elite soccer teams during the 2017 season.</p><p>METHODS: In the first and second soccer leagues for men and women, a Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) -based questionnaire study was performed at pre-season (baseline) and from 48h up to three months post-concussion.</p><p>RESULTS: We followed 959 players (389 women, 570 men) for 25146 player game hours (9867 h for women, 15279 h for men). Concussion incidence (n= 36) was 1.19/1000 player game hours (females 1.22/1000 h, males 1.18/1000 h; p= 0.85). Twenty-seven percent (females 8%, males 40%) of players continued to play immediately after the concussion. When compared to male players, female players had worse initial symptom severity scores (median and IQR 30 (17-50.5) vs. 11 (4-26.25), p=0.02) and longer return to play (p=0.02). Risk factors for concussion were baseline symptoms and previous concussion.</p><p>CONCLUSION: In Swedish elite soccer, the concussion incidence was 1.19/1000 without gender differences. Most players recovered to play within four weeks post-injury. Almost one third of players continued to play at time of concussion. Female players had worse initial symptoms and longer return-to-play time than males, and a prolonged recovery beyond three months was only observed among female players.</p>},
  author       = {Vedung, Fredrik and Hänni, Sofie and Tegner, Yelverton and Johansson, Jakob and Marklund, Niklas},
  issn         = {1600-0838},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports},
  title        = {Concussion incidence and recovery in Swedish elite soccer - prolonged recovery in female players},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.13644},
  doi          = {10.1111/sms.13644},
  year         = {2020},
}