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Memory-based attentional biases: Anxiety is linked to threat avoidance.

Rohner, Jean-Christophe LU (2004) In Cognition & Emotion 18(8). p.1027-1054
Abstract
The purpose of the present research was to examine if anxiety is linked to a memory-based attentional bias, in which attention to threat is thought to depend on implicit learning. Memory-based attentional biases were defined and also demonstrated in two experiments. A total of 168 university students were shown a pair of faces that varied in their emotional content (angry, neutral, and happy), with each type of emotion being consistently preceded by a particular neutral cue face, appearing in the same position. Eye movements were measured during these cue faces and during the emotional faces. The results of two experiments indicated that anxiety was connected with a tendency to avert one’s gaze from the positions of angry faces to the... (More)
The purpose of the present research was to examine if anxiety is linked to a memory-based attentional bias, in which attention to threat is thought to depend on implicit learning. Memory-based attentional biases were defined and also demonstrated in two experiments. A total of 168 university students were shown a pair of faces that varied in their emotional content (angry, neutral, and happy), with each type of emotion being consistently preceded by a particular neutral cue face, appearing in the same position. Eye movements were measured during these cue faces and during the emotional faces. The results of two experiments indicated that anxiety was connected with a tendency to avert one’s gaze from the positions of angry faces to the positions of happy faces, before these were shown on the screen. This, in turn, caused a reduced perception of angry relative to happy faces. In Experiment 2, participants were also not aware of having a memory-based attentional bias. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cognition & Emotion
volume
18
issue
8
pages
1027 - 1054
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000225760300002
  • scopus:10944253568
ISSN
0269-9931
DOI
10.1080/02699930341000365
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
188eb42d-f265-4eee-ab73-55817796d51e (old id 777658)
date added to LUP
2008-01-02 14:51:40
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:36:05
@article{188eb42d-f265-4eee-ab73-55817796d51e,
  abstract     = {The purpose of the present research was to examine if anxiety is linked to a memory-based attentional bias, in which attention to threat is thought to depend on implicit learning. Memory-based attentional biases were defined and also demonstrated in two experiments. A total of 168 university students were shown a pair of faces that varied in their emotional content (angry, neutral, and happy), with each type of emotion being consistently preceded by a particular neutral cue face, appearing in the same position. Eye movements were measured during these cue faces and during the emotional faces. The results of two experiments indicated that anxiety was connected with a tendency to avert one’s gaze from the positions of angry faces to the positions of happy faces, before these were shown on the screen. This, in turn, caused a reduced perception of angry relative to happy faces. In Experiment 2, participants were also not aware of having a memory-based attentional bias.},
  author       = {Rohner, Jean-Christophe},
  issn         = {0269-9931},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1027--1054},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Cognition & Emotion},
  title        = {Memory-based attentional biases: Anxiety is linked to threat avoidance.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699930341000365},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2004},
}