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Lighting Energy Saving with Light Pipe in Farm Animal Production

Von Wachenfelt, Hans; Vakouli, Vaia; Pacheco Diéguez, Alejandro; Gentile, Niko LU ; Dubois, Marie-Claude LU and Jeppsson, Knut-Håkan (2015) In Journal of Daylighting 2(2). p.21-31
Abstract
The Swedish animal production sector has potential for saving electric lighting of €4-9 million per year using efficient daylight utilisation. To demonstrate this, two light pipe systems, Velux® (house 1) and Solatube® (house 2), are installed in two identical pig houses to determine if the required light intensity, daylight autonomy (DA), and reduced electricity use for illumination can be achieved. In each house, three light sensors continuously measure the indoor daylight relative to an outdoor sensor. If the horizontal illuminance at pig height decreases below 40 lux between 08.00 and 16.00 hours, an automatic control system activates the lights, and electricity use is measured.. The daylight factor (DF) and DA are determined for each... (More)
The Swedish animal production sector has potential for saving electric lighting of €4-9 million per year using efficient daylight utilisation. To demonstrate this, two light pipe systems, Velux® (house 1) and Solatube® (house 2), are installed in two identical pig houses to determine if the required light intensity, daylight autonomy (DA), and reduced electricity use for illumination can be achieved. In each house, three light sensors continuously measure the indoor daylight relative to an outdoor sensor. If the horizontal illuminance at pig height decreases below 40 lux between 08.00 and 16.00 hours, an automatic control system activates the lights, and electricity use is measured.. The daylight factor (DF) and DA are determined for each house, based on annual climate data. The mean annual DA of 48% and 55% is achieved for house 1 and house 2, respectively. Light pipes in house 2 have delivered significantly more DA than those in house 1. The most common illuminance range between 0 and 160 lux is recorded in both houses, corresponding to approximately 82% and 83% of daylight time for house 1 and house 2, respectively. Further, the daylighting system for house 2 has produced a uniform DF distribution between 0.05 and 0.59. The results demonstrate that considerable electric energy savings can be achieved in the animal production sector using light pipes. Saving 50% of electric lighting would correspond to 36 GWh or 2520 t CO2 per year for Sweden, but currently the energy savings are not making the investment profitable. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Electric lighting, Energy saving, Daylighting, Light pipe
in
Journal of Daylighting
volume
2
issue
2
pages
21 - 31
publisher
Solarlits
ISSN
2383-8701
DOI
10.15627/jd.2015.5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b9486f79-53d0-4e35-ad2f-f139dcbed272 (old id 7864645)
date added to LUP
2015-10-09 13:51:37
date last changed
2016-04-15 21:15:22
@article{b9486f79-53d0-4e35-ad2f-f139dcbed272,
  abstract     = {The Swedish animal production sector has potential for saving electric lighting of €4-9 million per year using efficient daylight utilisation. To demonstrate this, two light pipe systems, Velux® (house 1) and Solatube® (house 2), are installed in two identical pig houses to determine if the required light intensity, daylight autonomy (DA), and reduced electricity use for illumination can be achieved. In each house, three light sensors continuously measure the indoor daylight relative to an outdoor sensor. If the horizontal illuminance at pig height decreases below 40 lux between 08.00 and 16.00 hours, an automatic control system activates the lights, and electricity use is measured.. The daylight factor (DF) and DA are determined for each house, based on annual climate data. The mean annual DA of 48% and 55% is achieved for house 1 and house 2, respectively. Light pipes in house 2 have delivered significantly more DA than those in house 1. The most common illuminance range between 0 and 160 lux is recorded in both houses, corresponding to approximately 82% and 83% of daylight time for house 1 and house 2, respectively. Further, the daylighting system for house 2 has produced a uniform DF distribution between 0.05 and 0.59. The results demonstrate that considerable electric energy savings can be achieved in the animal production sector using light pipes. Saving 50% of electric lighting would correspond to 36 GWh or 2520 t CO2 per year for Sweden, but currently the energy savings are not making the investment profitable.},
  author       = {Von Wachenfelt, Hans and Vakouli, Vaia and Pacheco Diéguez, Alejandro and Gentile, Niko and Dubois, Marie-Claude and Jeppsson, Knut-Håkan},
  issn         = {2383-8701},
  keyword      = {Electric lighting,Energy saving,Daylighting,Light pipe},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {21--31},
  publisher    = {Solarlits},
  series       = {Journal of Daylighting},
  title        = {Lighting Energy Saving with Light Pipe in Farm Animal Production},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.15627/jd.2015.5},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2015},
}