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Being Met as marked – patients’ experiences of being infected with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

Skyman, Eva ; Lindahl, Berit LU ; Bergbom, Ingegerd ; Sjöström, Harrieth Thunberg and Åhrén, Christina (2016) In Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences 30(4). p.813-820
Abstract

Background: It is known that patients who acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals suffer and feel as plague. Moreover, the patient interaction with nurses and physicians is described as frightening. Little is known about patient experiences after having acquired CA-MRSA concerning care and everyday life. Aim: To reveal and interpret otherwise healthy patients’ lived experiences of receiving care and their everyday life after having acquired community MRSA (CA-MRSA). Methods: A phenomenological hermeneutic approach guided by Ricouer was conducted. Interviews with twelve patients were transcribed verbatim into a text. The text was analysed in three phases: naive understanding, structural analysis and... (More)

Background: It is known that patients who acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals suffer and feel as plague. Moreover, the patient interaction with nurses and physicians is described as frightening. Little is known about patient experiences after having acquired CA-MRSA concerning care and everyday life. Aim: To reveal and interpret otherwise healthy patients’ lived experiences of receiving care and their everyday life after having acquired community MRSA (CA-MRSA). Methods: A phenomenological hermeneutic approach guided by Ricouer was conducted. Interviews with twelve patients were transcribed verbatim into a text. The text was analysed in three phases: naive understanding, structural analysis and comprehensive understanding to reveal a possible being in the world. In this study, this referred to what it means to be infected with CA-MRSA. Results: The findings indicate that patients who acquired MRSA experience a changed body image. They suffer from ignorant and frightened behavior from healthcare workers, social contacts, and also of being bullied by colleagues. Despite this, patients assume great responsibility for protecting others. However, knowledgeable staff alleviate suffering and bring peace of mind to the patients. Conclusions: Preventing patient's feelings of being a pest, an outsider living with fear, requires urgent education and understanding about resistant bacteria and how to meet an infected patient. The results describing patients, affected with MRSA, may contribute and touch the readers to better understanding of patient's changed body image and suffering and how to mitigate these feelings.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
abject, experience, ignorance, interaction, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, nursing, outsider, patient, vulnerable
in
Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
volume
30
issue
4
pages
813 - 820
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:26773522
  • scopus:85000839091
ISSN
0283-9318
DOI
10.1111/scs.12309
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
78b8e21a-f2e5-42da-99e6-288e908d340a
date added to LUP
2020-04-14 11:45:05
date last changed
2020-08-12 09:05:11
@article{78b8e21a-f2e5-42da-99e6-288e908d340a,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: It is known that patients who acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals suffer and feel as plague. Moreover, the patient interaction with nurses and physicians is described as frightening. Little is known about patient experiences after having acquired CA-MRSA concerning care and everyday life. Aim: To reveal and interpret otherwise healthy patients’ lived experiences of receiving care and their everyday life after having acquired community MRSA (CA-MRSA). Methods: A phenomenological hermeneutic approach guided by Ricouer was conducted. Interviews with twelve patients were transcribed verbatim into a text. The text was analysed in three phases: naive understanding, structural analysis and comprehensive understanding to reveal a possible being in the world. In this study, this referred to what it means to be infected with CA-MRSA. Results: The findings indicate that patients who acquired MRSA experience a changed body image. They suffer from ignorant and frightened behavior from healthcare workers, social contacts, and also of being bullied by colleagues. Despite this, patients assume great responsibility for protecting others. However, knowledgeable staff alleviate suffering and bring peace of mind to the patients. Conclusions: Preventing patient's feelings of being a pest, an outsider living with fear, requires urgent education and understanding about resistant bacteria and how to meet an infected patient. The results describing patients, affected with MRSA, may contribute and touch the readers to better understanding of patient's changed body image and suffering and how to mitigate these feelings.</p>},
  author       = {Skyman, Eva and Lindahl, Berit and Bergbom, Ingegerd and Sjöström, Harrieth Thunberg and Åhrén, Christina},
  issn         = {0283-9318},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {813--820},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences},
  title        = {Being Met as marked – patients’ experiences of being infected with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/scs.12309},
  doi          = {10.1111/scs.12309},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2016},
}