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Disentangling the holism of intentional systems from the interactionism of mechanistic systems in person-oriented research

Nilsson, Artur LU (2015) In Journal for Person-Oriented Research 1(3). p.171-183
Abstract
A key assumption in the person-oriented approach is that a person must be understood as a complex, integrated system, represented by patterns of within-person variation rather than scores on separate variables. The term ‘system’ does, however, have multiple meanings, which are not clearly distinguished in the person-oriented literature. I try to disentangle causal interactionism, which describes the psychological consequences and functions of each component of the system as dependent upon its causal interaction with other system components, from content holism, which describes the system components as in part constituted by their relations to each other and the system as a whole. Although the terms ‘interactionism’ and ‘holism’ are often... (More)
A key assumption in the person-oriented approach is that a person must be understood as a complex, integrated system, represented by patterns of within-person variation rather than scores on separate variables. The term ‘system’ does, however, have multiple meanings, which are not clearly distinguished in the person-oriented literature. I try to disentangle causal interactionism, which describes the psychological consequences and functions of each component of the system as dependent upon its causal interaction with other system components, from content holism, which describes the system components as in part constituted by their relations to each other and the system as a whole. Although the terms ‘interactionism’ and ‘holism’ are often treated as combinable and interchangeable, causal interactionism and content holism pertain to distinct kinds of research problems. Causal interactionism construes the person in terms of the hierarchically structured mechanistic systems that underpin his or her attributes and shape them over time, and can be exemplified in terms of Magnusson’s developmental approach, whereas content holism is integral to our understanding of the person as an intentional system, whose mental states and actions are interweaved through principles or logic and rationality rather than material causality, and can be exemplified in terms of Stephenson’s Q-methodological approach. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Holism, interactionism, person-oriented, system, organism, mechanism, mind, intentional, idiographic, nomothetic, philosophy of psychology
in
Journal for Person-Oriented Research
volume
1
issue
3
pages
171 - 183
publisher
Scandinavian Society for Person-Oriented Research
ISSN
2002-0244
DOI
10.17505/jpor.2015.18
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7c3973d1-762d-4f0f-aa0a-9b246058d1a0 (old id 7989637)
alternative location
http://www.person-research.ouradmin.se/articles/volume1_3/filer/3.pdf
date added to LUP
2015-09-24 12:56:39
date last changed
2016-04-16 01:53:32
@article{7c3973d1-762d-4f0f-aa0a-9b246058d1a0,
  abstract     = {A key assumption in the person-oriented approach is that a person must be understood as a complex, integrated system, represented by patterns of within-person variation rather than scores on separate variables. The term ‘system’ does, however, have multiple meanings, which are not clearly distinguished in the person-oriented literature. I try to disentangle causal interactionism, which describes the psychological consequences and functions of each component of the system as dependent upon its causal interaction with other system components, from content holism, which describes the system components as in part constituted by their relations to each other and the system as a whole. Although the terms ‘interactionism’ and ‘holism’ are often treated as combinable and interchangeable, causal interactionism and content holism pertain to distinct kinds of research problems. Causal interactionism construes the person in terms of the hierarchically structured mechanistic systems that underpin his or her attributes and shape them over time, and can be exemplified in terms of Magnusson’s developmental approach, whereas content holism is integral to our understanding of the person as an intentional system, whose mental states and actions are interweaved through principles or logic and rationality rather than material causality, and can be exemplified in terms of Stephenson’s Q-methodological approach.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Artur},
  issn         = {2002-0244},
  keyword      = {Holism,interactionism,person-oriented,system,organism,mechanism,mind,intentional,idiographic,nomothetic,philosophy of psychology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {171--183},
  publisher    = {Scandinavian Society for Person-Oriented Research},
  series       = {Journal for Person-Oriented Research},
  title        = {Disentangling the holism of intentional systems from the interactionism of mechanistic systems in person-oriented research},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.17505/jpor.2015.18},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2015},
}