Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Neural pattern classification tracks transfer-appropriate processing in episodic memory

Bramao, Ines LU and Johansson, Mikael LU orcid (2018) In eNeuro
Abstract
The transfer-appropriate processing (TAP) account holds that episodic memory depends on the overlap between encoding and retrieval processing. In the current study, we employed multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) of electroencephalography to examine the relevance of spontaneously engaged visual processing during encoding for later retrieval. Human participants encoded word- picture associations, where the picture could be a famous face, a landmark, or an object. At test, we manipulated the retrieval demands by asking participants to retrieve either visual or verbal information about the pictures. MVPA revealed classification between picture categories during early perceptual stages of encoding (∼170 ms). Importantly, these visual... (More)
The transfer-appropriate processing (TAP) account holds that episodic memory depends on the overlap between encoding and retrieval processing. In the current study, we employed multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) of electroencephalography to examine the relevance of spontaneously engaged visual processing during encoding for later retrieval. Human participants encoded word- picture associations, where the picture could be a famous face, a landmark, or an object. At test, we manipulated the retrieval demands by asking participants to retrieve either visual or verbal information about the pictures. MVPA revealed classification between picture categories during early perceptual stages of encoding (∼170 ms). Importantly, these visual category-specific neural patterns were predictive of later episodic remembering, but the direction of the relationship was contingent on the particular retrieval demand of the memory task: a benefit for the visual and a cost for the verbal. A reinstatement of the category-specific neural patterns established during encoding was observed during retrieval, and again the relationship with behavior varied with retrieval demands. Reactivation of visual representations during retrieval was associated with better memory in the visual task, but with lower performance in the verbal task. Our findings support and extend the TAP account by demonstrating that processing of particular aspects during memory formation can also have detrimental effects on later episodic remembering when other aspects of the event are called-for and shed new light on encoding and retrieval interactions in episodic memory. (Less)
Abstract (Swedish)
The transfer-appropriate processing (TAP) account holds that episodic memory depends on the overlap between encoding and retrieval processing. In the current study, we employed multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) of electroencephalography to examine the relevance of spontaneously engaged visual processing during encoding for later retrieval. Human participants encoded word- picture associations, where the picture could be a famous face, a landmark, or an object. At test, we manipulated the retrieval demands by asking participants to retrieve either visual or verbal information about the pictures. MVPA revealed classification between picture categories during early perceptual stages of encoding (~170 ms). Importantly, these visual... (More)
The transfer-appropriate processing (TAP) account holds that episodic memory depends on the overlap between encoding and retrieval processing. In the current study, we employed multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) of electroencephalography to examine the relevance of spontaneously engaged visual processing during encoding for later retrieval. Human participants encoded word- picture associations, where the picture could be a famous face, a landmark, or an object. At test, we manipulated the retrieval demands by asking participants to retrieve either visual or verbal information about the pictures. MVPA revealed classification between picture categories during early perceptual stages of encoding (~170 ms). Importantly, these visual category-specific neural patterns were predictive of later episodic remembering, but the direction of the relationship was contingent on the particular retrieval demand of the memory task: a benefit for the visual and a cost for the verbal. A reinstatement of the category-specific neural patterns established during encoding was observed during retrieval, and again the relationship with behavior varied with retrieval demands. Reactivation of visual representations during retrieval was associated with better memory in the visual task, but with lower performance in the verbal task. Our findings support and extend the TAP account by demonstrating that processing of particular aspects during memory formation can also have detrimental effects on later episodic remembering when other aspects of the event are called-for and shed new light on encoding and retrieval interactions in episodic memory. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
EEG, episodic memory, multivariate pattern analysis, transfer-appropriate processing
in
eNeuro
article number
ENEURO.0251-18.2018
publisher
Society for Neuroscience
external identifiers
  • scopus:85053241815
  • pmid:30225363
ISSN
2373-2822
DOI
10.1523/ENEURO.0251-18.2018
project
Measuring memory reactivation: The temporal dynamics of remembering
Learning and remembering: The cognitive neuroscience of memory for real-world events
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7c24e053-d527-4662-a032-d7b558549a33
date added to LUP
2018-07-24 00:03:03
date last changed
2021-09-29 03:28:04
@article{7c24e053-d527-4662-a032-d7b558549a33,
  abstract     = {The transfer-appropriate processing (TAP) account holds that episodic memory depends on the overlap between encoding and retrieval processing. In the current study, we employed multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) of electroencephalography to examine the relevance of spontaneously engaged visual processing during encoding for later retrieval. Human participants encoded word- picture associations, where the picture could be a famous face, a landmark, or an object. At test, we manipulated the retrieval demands by asking participants to retrieve either visual or verbal information about the pictures. MVPA revealed classification between picture categories during early perceptual stages of encoding (∼170 ms). Importantly, these visual category-specific neural patterns were predictive of later episodic remembering, but the direction of the relationship was contingent on the particular retrieval demand of the memory task: a benefit for the visual and a cost for the verbal. A reinstatement of the category-specific neural patterns established during encoding was observed during retrieval, and again the relationship with behavior varied with retrieval demands. Reactivation of visual representations during retrieval was associated with better memory in the visual task, but with lower performance in the verbal task. Our findings support and extend the TAP account by demonstrating that processing of particular aspects during memory formation can also have detrimental effects on later episodic remembering when other aspects of the event are called-for and shed new light on encoding and retrieval interactions in episodic memory.},
  author       = {Bramao, Ines and Johansson, Mikael},
  issn         = {2373-2822},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  publisher    = {Society for Neuroscience},
  series       = {eNeuro},
  title        = {Neural pattern classification tracks transfer-appropriate processing in episodic memory},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0251-18.2018},
  doi          = {10.1523/ENEURO.0251-18.2018},
  year         = {2018},
}