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Repeat Immigration: A Previously Unobserved Source of Heterogeneity?

Scott, Kirk LU ; Aradhya, Siddartha LU and Smith, Christopher LU (2017) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 45(Suppl 17). p.25-29
Abstract
AIMS:
Register data allow for nuanced analyses of heterogeneities between sub-groups which are not observable in other data sources. One heterogeneity for which register data is particularly useful is in identifying unique migration histories of immigrant populations, a group of interest across disciplines. Years since migration is a commonly used measure of integration in studies seeking to understand the outcomes of immigrants. This study constructs detailed migration histories to test whether misclassified migrations may mask important heterogeneities. In doing so, we identify a previously understudied group of migrants called repeat immigrants, and show that they differ systematically from permanent immigrants. In addition, we... (More)
AIMS:
Register data allow for nuanced analyses of heterogeneities between sub-groups which are not observable in other data sources. One heterogeneity for which register data is particularly useful is in identifying unique migration histories of immigrant populations, a group of interest across disciplines. Years since migration is a commonly used measure of integration in studies seeking to understand the outcomes of immigrants. This study constructs detailed migration histories to test whether misclassified migrations may mask important heterogeneities. In doing so, we identify a previously understudied group of migrants called repeat immigrants, and show that they differ systematically from permanent immigrants. In addition, we quantify the degree to which migration information is misreported in the registers.

METHOD:
The analysis is carried out in two steps. First, we estimate income trajectories for repeat immigrants and permanent immigrants to understand the degree to which they differ. Second, we test data validity by cross-referencing migration information with changes in income to determine whether there are inconsistencies indicating misreporting.

RESULTS:
From the first part of the analysis, the results indicate that repeat immigrants systematically differ from permanent immigrants in terms of income trajectories. Furthermore, income trajectories differ based on the way in which years since migration is calculated. The second part of the analysis suggests that misreported migration events, while present, are negligible.

CONCLUSIONS:
Repeat immigrants differ in terms of income trajectories, and may differ in terms of other outcomes as well. Furthermore, this study underlines that Swedish registers provide a reliable data source to analyze groups which are unidentifiable in other data sources.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
repeat migration, immigration, bias
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
45
issue
Suppl 17
pages
25 - 29
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85022175874
  • wos:000405007800005
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1177/1403494817702334
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7d10c23e-3611-4030-88e2-4a9e25823570
date added to LUP
2017-07-21 21:34:35
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:39:01
@article{7d10c23e-3611-4030-88e2-4a9e25823570,
  abstract     = {AIMS:<br/>Register data allow for nuanced analyses of heterogeneities between sub-groups which are not observable in other data sources. One heterogeneity for which register data is particularly useful is in identifying unique migration histories of immigrant populations, a group of interest across disciplines. Years since migration is a commonly used measure of integration in studies seeking to understand the outcomes of immigrants. This study constructs detailed migration histories to test whether misclassified migrations may mask important heterogeneities. In doing so, we identify a previously understudied group of migrants called repeat immigrants, and show that they differ systematically from permanent immigrants. In addition, we quantify the degree to which migration information is misreported in the registers.<br/><br/>METHOD:<br/>The analysis is carried out in two steps. First, we estimate income trajectories for repeat immigrants and permanent immigrants to understand the degree to which they differ. Second, we test data validity by cross-referencing migration information with changes in income to determine whether there are inconsistencies indicating misreporting.<br/><br/>RESULTS:<br/>From the first part of the analysis, the results indicate that repeat immigrants systematically differ from permanent immigrants in terms of income trajectories. Furthermore, income trajectories differ based on the way in which years since migration is calculated. The second part of the analysis suggests that misreported migration events, while present, are negligible.<br/><br/>CONCLUSIONS:<br/>Repeat immigrants differ in terms of income trajectories, and may differ in terms of other outcomes as well. Furthermore, this study underlines that Swedish registers provide a reliable data source to analyze groups which are unidentifiable in other data sources.<br/> <br/> },
  author       = {Scott, Kirk and Aradhya, Siddartha and Smith, Christopher},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  keyword      = {repeat migration,immigration,bias},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Suppl 17},
  pages        = {25--29},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Repeat Immigration: A Previously Unobserved Source of Heterogeneity?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494817702334},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2017},
}