Advanced

Where Forest Carbon Meets Its Maker: Forestry-Based Offsetting as the Subsumption of Nature

Carton, Wim LU and Andersson, Elina LU (2017) In Society and Natural Resources 30(7). p.829-843
Abstract (Swedish)
The “subsumption of nature” framework focuses on productivity increases and extractive innovations in nature-based industries. In this article, we argue that it can also be employed beyond that context in order to capture the convoluted dynamics of market environmentalism. To substantiate our argument, we draw on recent fieldwork on “Trees for Global Benefits,” a forestry-based offsetting project in western Uganda. Like industrial tree plantations, this project relies on the subsumption of carbon sequestration to market imperatives in order to guarantee the quality of its carbon credits. The ecological and socioeconomic difficulties this process engenders give rise to unintended consequences and set in motion the disciplining of the carbon... (More)
The “subsumption of nature” framework focuses on productivity increases and extractive innovations in nature-based industries. In this article, we argue that it can also be employed beyond that context in order to capture the convoluted dynamics of market environmentalism. To substantiate our argument, we draw on recent fieldwork on “Trees for Global Benefits,” a forestry-based offsetting project in western Uganda. Like industrial tree plantations, this project relies on the subsumption of carbon sequestration to market imperatives in order to guarantee the quality of its carbon credits. The ecological and socioeconomic difficulties this process engenders give rise to unintended consequences and set in motion the disciplining of the carbon offset producers themselves. The application of the subsumption framework to nonindustrial sectors in this way calls attention to the interlinked socioecological dynamics involved in the subsumption of nature, and highlights potential synergies with previous work on the subsumption of labor. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Society and Natural Resources
volume
30
issue
7
pages
829 - 843
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85013082462
  • wos:000402012200004
ISSN
0894-1920
DOI
10.1080/08941920.2017.1284291
language
Swedish
LU publication?
yes
id
7df1d450-5acd-443f-a75b-857a38107fff
date added to LUP
2017-02-17 05:50:08
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:50:36
@article{7df1d450-5acd-443f-a75b-857a38107fff,
  abstract     = {The “subsumption of nature” framework focuses on productivity increases and extractive innovations in nature-based industries. In this article, we argue that it can also be employed beyond that context in order to capture the convoluted dynamics of market environmentalism. To substantiate our argument, we draw on recent fieldwork on “Trees for Global Benefits,” a forestry-based offsetting project in western Uganda. Like industrial tree plantations, this project relies on the subsumption of carbon sequestration to market imperatives in order to guarantee the quality of its carbon credits. The ecological and socioeconomic difficulties this process engenders give rise to unintended consequences and set in motion the disciplining of the carbon offset producers themselves. The application of the subsumption framework to nonindustrial sectors in this way calls attention to the interlinked socioecological dynamics involved in the subsumption of nature, and highlights potential synergies with previous work on the subsumption of labor.},
  author       = {Carton, Wim and Andersson, Elina},
  issn         = {0894-1920},
  language     = {swe},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {829--843},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Society and Natural Resources},
  title        = {Where Forest Carbon Meets Its Maker: Forestry-Based Offsetting as the Subsumption of Nature},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08941920.2017.1284291},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2017},
}