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Competence and confusion: How stereotype threat can make you a bad judge of your competence

Tellhed, Una LU and Adolfsson, Caroline (2017) In European Journal of Social Psychology
Abstract
Women tend to have competence doubts for masculine-stereotyped domains
(e.g., math), whereas men tend to think they can handle both feminine-stereotyped and masculine-stereotyped domains equally well. We suggest that perhaps women’s more frequent experience with stereotype threat can
partly explain why. Our results showed that when stereotype threat was
primed in high school students (n = 244), there was no relationship between
their performance on an academic test (the SweSAT) and their assessment of
their performance (how well they did), whereas in a non-stereotype threat
condition, there was a medium-sized relationship. The effect was similar for
both men and women primed with stereotype threat. The results... (More)
Women tend to have competence doubts for masculine-stereotyped domains
(e.g., math), whereas men tend to think they can handle both feminine-stereotyped and masculine-stereotyped domains equally well. We suggest that perhaps women’s more frequent experience with stereotype threat can
partly explain why. Our results showed that when stereotype threat was
primed in high school students (n = 244), there was no relationship between
their performance on an academic test (the SweSAT) and their assessment of
their performance (how well they did), whereas in a non-stereotype threat
condition, there was a medium-sized relationship. The effect was similar for
both men and women primed with stereotype threat. The results imply that
stereotype threat undermines performance assessments. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Social Psychology
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
ISSN
1099-0992
DOI
10.1002/ejsp.2307
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7f5ed7ca-8332-4bd5-b3f4-f89911a2cccc
date added to LUP
2017-03-06 12:48:09
date last changed
2017-11-10 13:07:47
@article{7f5ed7ca-8332-4bd5-b3f4-f89911a2cccc,
  abstract     = {Women tend to have competence doubts for masculine-stereotyped domains<br/>(e.g., math), whereas men tend to think they can handle both feminine-stereotyped and masculine-stereotyped domains equally well. We suggest that perhaps women’s more frequent experience with stereotype threat can<br/>partly explain why. Our results showed that when stereotype threat was<br/>primed in high school students (n = 244), there was no relationship between<br/>their performance on an academic test (the SweSAT) and their assessment of<br/>their performance (how well they did), whereas in a non-stereotype threat<br/>condition, there was a medium-sized relationship. The effect was similar for<br/>both men and women primed with stereotype threat. The results imply that<br/>stereotype threat undermines performance assessments.},
  author       = {Tellhed, Una and Adolfsson, Caroline},
  issn         = {1099-0992},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {European Journal of Social Psychology},
  title        = {Competence and confusion: How stereotype threat can make you a bad judge of your competence},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2307},
  year         = {2017},
}