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Impact of pregestational weight and weight gain during pregnancy on long-term risk for diseases

Moll, Ulrika LU ; Olsson, Håkan LU and Landin-Olsson, Mona LU (2017) In PLoS ONE 12(1).
Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of maternal BMI at start of pregnancy and maternal weight gain during pregnancy on the risk of various diseases later in life. Methods: In a population-based cohort from southern Sweden, women with at least one delivery registered in the Swedish Medical Birth Register ten or more years before answering a health questionnaire were identified (n = 13,608). Complete data were found in 3,539 women. Results: Women with BMI >25 at start of pregnancy had increased risk of developing obesity (OR 21.9), diabetes (OR 6.4), cardiac disease (OR 2.7), endocrine diseases (OR 2.3), and other morbidity (OR 1.4), compared with women of normal weight. A high weight gain (>15 kg) during... (More)

Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of maternal BMI at start of pregnancy and maternal weight gain during pregnancy on the risk of various diseases later in life. Methods: In a population-based cohort from southern Sweden, women with at least one delivery registered in the Swedish Medical Birth Register ten or more years before answering a health questionnaire were identified (n = 13,608). Complete data were found in 3,539 women. Results: Women with BMI >25 at start of pregnancy had increased risk of developing obesity (OR 21.9), diabetes (OR 6.4), cardiac disease (OR 2.7), endocrine diseases (OR 2.3), and other morbidity (OR 1.4), compared with women of normal weight. A high weight gain (>15 kg) during pregnancy was associated to later risk of overweight (OR 2.0) and obesity (OR 2.2), but not diabetes, cardiac disease, or endocrine diseases. A positive association was found between low weight gain and the risk of developing psychiatric disorders (OR 1.6). Conclusions: A high BMI at start of pregnancy significantly increased the risk of several diseases later in life. However, a high weight gain during pregnancy was only significant for future overweight and obesity. These findings have implications for both pregestational intervention and post gestational follow up of obese and overweight women.

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author
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
PLoS ONE
volume
12
issue
1
publisher
Public Library of Science
external identifiers
  • scopus:85008233955
  • wos:000391612300031
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0168543
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8008e9bf-c25a-438e-9a80-75bad78d76ad
date added to LUP
2017-01-13 14:07:39
date last changed
2018-05-06 04:29:48
@article{8008e9bf-c25a-438e-9a80-75bad78d76ad,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of maternal BMI at start of pregnancy and maternal weight gain during pregnancy on the risk of various diseases later in life. Methods: In a population-based cohort from southern Sweden, women with at least one delivery registered in the Swedish Medical Birth Register ten or more years before answering a health questionnaire were identified (n = 13,608). Complete data were found in 3,539 women. Results: Women with BMI &gt;25 at start of pregnancy had increased risk of developing obesity (OR 21.9), diabetes (OR 6.4), cardiac disease (OR 2.7), endocrine diseases (OR 2.3), and other morbidity (OR 1.4), compared with women of normal weight. A high weight gain (&gt;15 kg) during pregnancy was associated to later risk of overweight (OR 2.0) and obesity (OR 2.2), but not diabetes, cardiac disease, or endocrine diseases. A positive association was found between low weight gain and the risk of developing psychiatric disorders (OR 1.6). Conclusions: A high BMI at start of pregnancy significantly increased the risk of several diseases later in life. However, a high weight gain during pregnancy was only significant for future overweight and obesity. These findings have implications for both pregestational intervention and post gestational follow up of obese and overweight women.</p>},
  articleno    = {e0168543},
  author       = {Moll, Ulrika and Olsson, Håkan and Landin-Olsson, Mona},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {Public Library of Science},
  series       = {PLoS ONE},
  title        = {Impact of pregestational weight and weight gain during pregnancy on long-term risk for diseases},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0168543},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2017},
}