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SPARC: A Potential Prognostic and Therapeutic Target in Pancreatic Cancer.

Vaz, Juan LU ; Ansari, Daniel LU ; Sasor, Agata and Andersson, Roland LU (2015) In Pancreas 44(7). p.1024-1035
Abstract
Pancreatic cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease that often lacks disease-specific symptoms in early stages. The malignancy is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. In advanced stages, the overall 5-year survival is less than 1% to 2%. Most available treatments lack convincing cost-efficiency determinations and are generally not associated with relevant success rates. Targeting stromal components and stromal depletion is currently becoming an area of extensive research in pancreatic cancer. In this context, a glycoprotein, SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) appears to play a central role. Still, the role of SPARC in carcinogenesis is controversial because conflicting... (More)
Pancreatic cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease that often lacks disease-specific symptoms in early stages. The malignancy is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. In advanced stages, the overall 5-year survival is less than 1% to 2%. Most available treatments lack convincing cost-efficiency determinations and are generally not associated with relevant success rates. Targeting stromal components and stromal depletion is currently becoming an area of extensive research in pancreatic cancer. In this context, a glycoprotein, SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) appears to play a central role. Still, the role of SPARC in carcinogenesis is controversial because conflicting results have been reported, and the pathways involved in SPARC signaling are not well established. Nonetheless, SPARC is highly expressed in the tumor stroma, principally in peritumoral fibroblasts, and the overexpression of SPARC in this compartment is associated with poorer prognosis. Interestingly, it has been suggested that SPARC present in the tumor stroma could sequester albumin-bound paclitaxel, enhancing the delivery of paclitaxel into the tumor microenvironment. In the present review, we summarize the known associations between SPARC and pancreatic cancer. Moreover, present and future therapies comprising SPARC-targeting are discussed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pancreas
volume
44
issue
7
pages
1024 - 1035
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:26335014
  • wos:000361605100004
  • scopus:84934336172
ISSN
0885-3177
DOI
10.1097/MPA.0000000000000409
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
968d9d52-9b8f-4e41-9adf-124a11f5adbf (old id 8043313)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26335014?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-10-04 18:37:34
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:15:40
@article{968d9d52-9b8f-4e41-9adf-124a11f5adbf,
  abstract     = {Pancreatic cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease that often lacks disease-specific symptoms in early stages. The malignancy is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. In advanced stages, the overall 5-year survival is less than 1% to 2%. Most available treatments lack convincing cost-efficiency determinations and are generally not associated with relevant success rates. Targeting stromal components and stromal depletion is currently becoming an area of extensive research in pancreatic cancer. In this context, a glycoprotein, SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) appears to play a central role. Still, the role of SPARC in carcinogenesis is controversial because conflicting results have been reported, and the pathways involved in SPARC signaling are not well established. Nonetheless, SPARC is highly expressed in the tumor stroma, principally in peritumoral fibroblasts, and the overexpression of SPARC in this compartment is associated with poorer prognosis. Interestingly, it has been suggested that SPARC present in the tumor stroma could sequester albumin-bound paclitaxel, enhancing the delivery of paclitaxel into the tumor microenvironment. In the present review, we summarize the known associations between SPARC and pancreatic cancer. Moreover, present and future therapies comprising SPARC-targeting are discussed.},
  author       = {Vaz, Juan and Ansari, Daniel and Sasor, Agata and Andersson, Roland},
  issn         = {0885-3177},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1024--1035},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Pancreas},
  title        = {SPARC: A Potential Prognostic and Therapeutic Target in Pancreatic Cancer.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPA.0000000000000409},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2015},
}