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Memory bias for faces that are perceived as hostile by crime victims with acute posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Paunovic, N; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar LU and Öst, L.G (2003) In Cognitive Behaviour Therapy 32(4). p.203-214
Abstract
The present study tested, and found support for, the hypotheses that crime victims with acute post-traumatic stress disorder have: (1) a general memory impairment for faces; and (ii) a memory bias for faces that they perceive as hostile, even when these faces are not arranged to show any hostile face expressions. It is suggested that crime victims with acute post-traumatic stress disorder perform worse on recognition memory due to impaired concentration, and that they allocate their limited attentional resources to the detection of hostility in others in order to avoid being victimized again. This produces a memory bias for perceived hostility even in relatively innocuous everyday interactions with others, which contributes to maintaining... (More)
The present study tested, and found support for, the hypotheses that crime victims with acute post-traumatic stress disorder have: (1) a general memory impairment for faces; and (ii) a memory bias for faces that they perceive as hostile, even when these faces are not arranged to show any hostile face expressions. It is suggested that crime victims with acute post-traumatic stress disorder perform worse on recognition memory due to impaired concentration, and that they allocate their limited attentional resources to the detection of hostility in others in order to avoid being victimized again. This produces a memory bias for perceived hostility even in relatively innocuous everyday interactions with others, which contributes to maintaining the sense of serious current threat that characterizes post-traumatic stress disorder. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
volume
32
issue
4
pages
203 - 214
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:0344826485
ISSN
1651-2316
DOI
10.1080/16506070310000948
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
96df32da-846e-4959-9757-d0f2fb260748 (old id 806307)
date added to LUP
2008-01-30 17:46:06
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:01:11
@article{96df32da-846e-4959-9757-d0f2fb260748,
  abstract     = {The present study tested, and found support for, the hypotheses that crime victims with acute post-traumatic stress disorder have: (1) a general memory impairment for faces; and (ii) a memory bias for faces that they perceive as hostile, even when these faces are not arranged to show any hostile face expressions. It is suggested that crime victims with acute post-traumatic stress disorder perform worse on recognition memory due to impaired concentration, and that they allocate their limited attentional resources to the detection of hostility in others in order to avoid being victimized again. This produces a memory bias for perceived hostility even in relatively innocuous everyday interactions with others, which contributes to maintaining the sense of serious current threat that characterizes post-traumatic stress disorder.},
  author       = {Paunovic, N and Lundh, Lars-Gunnar and Öst, L.G},
  issn         = {1651-2316},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {203--214},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Cognitive Behaviour Therapy},
  title        = {Memory bias for faces that are perceived as hostile by crime victims with acute posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/16506070310000948},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2003},
}