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A darker side of hypermobility.

Cohen, Scott A and Gössling, Stefan LU (2015) In Environment & Planning A 47(8). p.1661-1679
Abstract
Since the formulation of the mobilities paradigm, research has shown that movement is increasingly at the heart of our social identities. This paper argues that mobility, and indeed, hypermobility, constitutes to a growing extent who we are, whilst societal perspectives on mobility increasingly dictate how we need to move in time and space in order to accrue network capital. In this critical review, deeply embedded mechanisms of the social glamorization of mobility are uncovered, and juxtaposed with what we call a ‘darker side’ of hypermobility, including the physiological, psychological, emotional and social costs of mobility for individuals and societies. The paper concludes that whilst aspects of glamorization in regard to mobility are... (More)
Since the formulation of the mobilities paradigm, research has shown that movement is increasingly at the heart of our social identities. This paper argues that mobility, and indeed, hypermobility, constitutes to a growing extent who we are, whilst societal perspectives on mobility increasingly dictate how we need to move in time and space in order to accrue network capital. In this critical review, deeply embedded mechanisms of the social glamorization of mobility are uncovered, and juxtaposed with what we call a ‘darker side’ of hypermobility, including the physiological, psychological, emotional and social costs of mobility for individuals and societies. The paper concludes that whilst aspects of glamorization in regard to mobility are omnipresent in our lives, there exists an ominous silence with regard to its darker side. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
glamorization, network capital, mobility consequences, transport, behavior change
in
Environment & Planning A
volume
47
issue
8
pages
1661 - 1679
publisher
Pion Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000363412200001
  • scopus:84945200318
ISSN
0308-518X
DOI
10.1177/0308518X15597124
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
36ec44cc-c16a-4172-bb98-a461661edb59 (old id 8168339)
date added to LUP
2015-11-11 16:05:05
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:05:45
@article{36ec44cc-c16a-4172-bb98-a461661edb59,
  abstract     = {Since the formulation of the mobilities paradigm, research has shown that movement is increasingly at the heart of our social identities. This paper argues that mobility, and indeed, hypermobility, constitutes to a growing extent who we are, whilst societal perspectives on mobility increasingly dictate how we need to move in time and space in order to accrue network capital. In this critical review, deeply embedded mechanisms of the social glamorization of mobility are uncovered, and juxtaposed with what we call a ‘darker side’ of hypermobility, including the physiological, psychological, emotional and social costs of mobility for individuals and societies. The paper concludes that whilst aspects of glamorization in regard to mobility are omnipresent in our lives, there exists an ominous silence with regard to its darker side.},
  author       = {Cohen, Scott A and Gössling, Stefan},
  issn         = {0308-518X},
  keyword      = {glamorization,network capital,mobility consequences,transport,behavior change},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1661--1679},
  publisher    = {Pion Ltd},
  series       = {Environment & Planning A},
  title        = {A darker side of hypermobility.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0308518X15597124},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2015},
}