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Policing Migration: Described and Observed Cooperation Experiences of Police and Border Guards in the Baltic Sea Area

Yakhlef, Sophia LU ; Basic, Goran LU and Åkerström, Malin LU (2017) In Journal of Applied Security Research 12(1). p.117-140
Abstract (Swedish)
“Collaboration” is generally portrayed as being beneficial to intelligence and operational police work, even if previous collaborative research shows that conflicts are common between authorities who are supposed to cooperate. The present study focuses on how officers collaborate in their day-to-day management of borderguarding, taking into consideration the different social and cultural backgrounds of the project participants. To these ends, this qualitative, ethnographically study is based on empirical material gathered from interviews, field observation sessions with officers working at the Baltic Sea border agencies and documents. The findings suggest that, although collaboration is burdened with bureaucratic difficulties, there is a... (More)
“Collaboration” is generally portrayed as being beneficial to intelligence and operational police work, even if previous collaborative research shows that conflicts are common between authorities who are supposed to cooperate. The present study focuses on how officers collaborate in their day-to-day management of borderguarding, taking into consideration the different social and cultural backgrounds of the project participants. To these ends, this qualitative, ethnographically study is based on empirical material gathered from interviews, field observation sessions with officers working at the Baltic Sea border agencies and documents. The findings suggest that, although collaboration is burdened with bureaucratic difficulties, there is a common understanding of purpose among the project participants. These border officers’ common declared their objective is to fight criminality and createa safer Europe. However, the participants possessing different organizational and cultural backgrounds have to adapt to adopta common language (in officers’ terms EU-English), common schemes of categorizing (inside-outside distinctions), and develop a sense of trust and identity. Collaboration is claimed by the informants, and is best achieved through getting involved ineveryday practices. They worked side by side, and spent free time together rather than following bureaucratic rules and regulations. (Less)
Abstract
“Collaboration” is generally portrayed as being beneficial to intelligence and operational police work, even if previous collaborative research shows that conflicts are common between authorities who are supposed to cooperate. The present study focuses on how officers collaborate in their day-to-day management of border guarding, taking into consideration the different social and cultural backgrounds of the project participants. To these ends, this qualitative, ethnographically study is based on empirical material gathered from interviews, field observation sessions with officers working at the Baltic Sea border agencies and documents. The findings suggest that, although collaboration is burdened with bureaucratic difficulties, there is a... (More)
“Collaboration” is generally portrayed as being beneficial to intelligence and operational police work, even if previous collaborative research shows that conflicts are common between authorities who are supposed to cooperate. The present study focuses on how officers collaborate in their day-to-day management of border guarding, taking into consideration the different social and cultural backgrounds of the project participants. To these ends, this qualitative, ethnographically study is based on empirical material gathered from interviews, field observation sessions with officers working at the Baltic Sea border agencies and documents. The findings suggest that, although collaboration is burdened with bureaucratic difficulties, there is a common understanding of purpose among the project participants. These border officers' common declared their objective is to fight criminality and create a safer Europe. However, the participants possessing different organizational and cultural backgrounds have to adapt to adopt a common language (in officers' terms EU-English), common schemes of categorizing (inside-outside distinctions), and develop a sense of trust and identity. Collaboration is claimed by the informants, and is best achieved through getting involved in everyday practices. They worked side by side, and spent free time together rather than following bureaucratic rules and regulations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
border guards, policing borders, Baltic Sea area, policing migration, cooperation, European border politics, intelligence and operational police work, surveillance, collaboration, qualitative interviews, field work, field notes, collaboration identity
in
Journal of Applied Security Research
volume
12
issue
1
pages
23 pages
external identifiers
  • scopus:85010042081
  • wos:000396694900007
DOI
10.1080/19361610.2017.1228422
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
823c7bd9-f2bd-470d-829b-b3d525afab38
date added to LUP
2017-01-18 07:44:48
date last changed
2018-10-07 04:51:39
@article{823c7bd9-f2bd-470d-829b-b3d525afab38,
  abstract     = {“Collaboration” is generally portrayed as being beneficial to intelligence and operational police work, even if previous collaborative research shows that conflicts are common between authorities who are supposed to cooperate. The present study focuses on how officers collaborate in their day-to-day management of border guarding, taking into consideration the different social and cultural backgrounds of the project participants. To these ends, this qualitative, ethnographically study is based on empirical material gathered from interviews, field observation sessions with officers working at the Baltic Sea border agencies and documents. The findings suggest that, although collaboration is burdened with bureaucratic difficulties, there is a common understanding of purpose among the project participants. These border officers' common declared their objective is to fight criminality and create a safer Europe. However, the participants possessing different organizational and cultural backgrounds have to adapt to adopt a common language (in officers' terms EU-English), common schemes of categorizing (inside-outside distinctions), and develop a sense of trust and identity. Collaboration is claimed by the informants, and is best achieved through getting involved in everyday practices. They worked side by side, and spent free time together rather than following bureaucratic rules and regulations.},
  author       = {Yakhlef, Sophia and Basic, Goran and Åkerström, Malin},
  keyword      = {border guards, policing borders, Baltic Sea area, policing migration, cooperation, European border politics, intelligence and operational police work, surveillance, collaboration, qualitative interviews, field work, field notes, collaboration identity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {117--140},
  series       = {Journal of Applied Security Research},
  title        = {Policing Migration: Described and Observed Cooperation Experiences of Police and Border Guards in the Baltic Sea Area},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19361610.2017.1228422},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2017},
}