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Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio versus Fractional Flow Reserve guided intervention (iFR-SWEDEHEART): Rationale and design of a multicenter, prospective, registry-based randomized clinical trial.

Götberg, Matthias LU ; Christiansen, Evald H; Gudmundsdottir, Ingibjörg; Sandhall, Lennart; Omerovic, Elmir; James, Stefan K; Erlinge, David LU and Fröbert, Ole (2015) In American Heart Journal 170(5). p.945-950
Abstract
Instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) is a new hemodynamic resting index for assessment of coronary artery stenosis severity. iFR uses high frequency sampling to calculate a gradient across a coronary lesion during a period of diastole. The index has been tested against fractional flow reserve (FFR) and found to have an overall classification agreement of 80% to 85%. Whether the level of disagreement is clinically relevant is unknown. Clinical outcome data on iFR are scarce. This study is a registry-based randomized clinical trial, which is a novel strategy using health quality registries as on-line platforms for randomization, case record forms, and follow-up.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
American Heart Journal
volume
170
issue
5
pages
945 - 950
publisher
Mosby
external identifiers
  • pmid:26542503
  • wos:000364434600015
  • scopus:84954229158
ISSN
1097-6744
DOI
10.1016/j.ahj.2015.07.031
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ce5b0a38-8a7b-4838-aa28-ed6333b0e9ed (old id 8243018)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26542503?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-12-02 23:27:00
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:19:02
@article{ce5b0a38-8a7b-4838-aa28-ed6333b0e9ed,
  abstract     = {Instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) is a new hemodynamic resting index for assessment of coronary artery stenosis severity. iFR uses high frequency sampling to calculate a gradient across a coronary lesion during a period of diastole. The index has been tested against fractional flow reserve (FFR) and found to have an overall classification agreement of 80% to 85%. Whether the level of disagreement is clinically relevant is unknown. Clinical outcome data on iFR are scarce. This study is a registry-based randomized clinical trial, which is a novel strategy using health quality registries as on-line platforms for randomization, case record forms, and follow-up.},
  author       = {Götberg, Matthias and Christiansen, Evald H and Gudmundsdottir, Ingibjörg and Sandhall, Lennart and Omerovic, Elmir and James, Stefan K and Erlinge, David and Fröbert, Ole},
  issn         = {1097-6744},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {945--950},
  publisher    = {Mosby},
  series       = {American Heart Journal},
  title        = {Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio versus Fractional Flow Reserve guided intervention (iFR-SWEDEHEART): Rationale and design of a multicenter, prospective, registry-based randomized clinical trial.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2015.07.031},
  volume       = {170},
  year         = {2015},
}