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Industrialization and inequality revisited: Mortality differentials and vulnerability to economic stress in Stockholm, 1878-1926.

Molitoris, Joseph LU and Dribe, Martin LU (2016) In European Review of Economic History 20(2). p.176-197
Abstract
This work combines economic and demographic data to examine inequality of living standards in Stockholm at the turn of the twentieth century. Using a longitudinal population register with occupational information, we utilize event-history models to show that despite absolute decreases in mortality, relative differences between socioeconomic groups remained virtually constant. The results also show that child mortality continued to be sensitive to short-term fluctuations in wages and that there were no socioeconomic differences in this response. We argue that the persistent inequality in living standards was possibly due to differences in residential patterns and nutrition.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Review of Economic History
volume
20
issue
2
pages
22 pages
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:84973091665
  • wos:000377469300003
ISSN
1474-0044
DOI
10.1093/ereh/hev023
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2a3280ff-75fc-4043-8506-099e0b970713 (old id 8302812)
date added to LUP
2015-12-08 10:25:50
date last changed
2017-04-09 04:43:01
@article{2a3280ff-75fc-4043-8506-099e0b970713,
  abstract     = {This work combines economic and demographic data to examine inequality of living standards in Stockholm at the turn of the twentieth century. Using a longitudinal population register with occupational information, we utilize event-history models to show that despite absolute decreases in mortality, relative differences between socioeconomic groups remained virtually constant. The results also show that child mortality continued to be sensitive to short-term fluctuations in wages and that there were no socioeconomic differences in this response. We argue that the persistent inequality in living standards was possibly due to differences in residential patterns and nutrition.},
  author       = {Molitoris, Joseph and Dribe, Martin},
  issn         = {1474-0044},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {176--197},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {European Review of Economic History},
  title        = {Industrialization and inequality revisited: Mortality differentials and vulnerability to economic stress in Stockholm, 1878-1926.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ereh/hev023},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2016},
}