Advanced

The Nobel Prize: the identity of a corporate heritage brand

Urde, Mats LU and Greyser, Stephen A (2015) In Journal of Product & Brand Management 24(4). p.318-332
Abstract
Purpose – The purpose of this study is to understand the identity of the Nobel Prize as a corporate heritage brand and its management challenges.



Design/methodology/approach – An in-depth case study analysed within a heritage brand model and a corporate brand identity framework.



Findings – The Nobel Prize is a corporate heritage brand – one whose value proposition is based on heritage – in this case “achievements for the benefit of mankind” (derived directly from Alfred Nobel’s will). It is also defined as a “networked brand”, one where four independent collaborating organisations around the (Nobel) hub create and sustain the Nobel Prize’s identity and reputation, acting as a “federated... (More)
Purpose – The purpose of this study is to understand the identity of the Nobel Prize as a corporate heritage brand and its management challenges.



Design/methodology/approach – An in-depth case study analysed within a heritage brand model and a corporate brand identity framework.



Findings – The Nobel Prize is a corporate heritage brand – one whose value proposition is based on heritage – in this case “achievements for the benefit of mankind” (derived directly from Alfred Nobel’s will). It is also defined as a “networked brand”, one where four independent collaborating organisations around the (Nobel) hub create and sustain the Nobel Prize’s identity and reputation, acting as a “federated republic”.



Research limitations/implications – The new and combined application of the Heritage Quotient framework and the Corporate Brand Identity

Matrix in the Heritage Brand Identity Process (HBIP) offers a structured approach to integrate the identity of a corporate heritage brand. In a networked situation, understanding the role of stewardship in collaborating organisations is essential: The network entities maintain their own identities and goals, but share common values of the network hub.



Practical implications – The integrated frameworks (HBIP) provides a platform for managing a corporate heritage brand.



Originality/value – This is the first field-based study of the Nobel Prize from a strategic brand management perspective. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Nobel Prize, Brand stewardship, Corporate brand identity, Corporate heritage brand, Heritage Brand Identity Process, Networked brand
in
Journal of Product & Brand Management
volume
24
issue
4
pages
318 - 332
publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
external identifiers
  • scopus:84937393743
ISSN
1061-0421
DOI
10.1108/JPBM-11-2014-0749
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fdf1f9b1-c015-4821-8c5d-9e2aa59677a5 (old id 8310981)
date added to LUP
2015-12-14 09:45:17
date last changed
2017-07-09 04:06:58
@article{fdf1f9b1-c015-4821-8c5d-9e2aa59677a5,
  abstract     = {Purpose – The purpose of this study is to understand the identity of the Nobel Prize as a corporate heritage brand and its management challenges.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Design/methodology/approach – An in-depth case study analysed within a heritage brand model and a corporate brand identity framework.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Findings – The Nobel Prize is a corporate heritage brand – one whose value proposition is based on heritage – in this case “achievements for the benefit of mankind” (derived directly from Alfred Nobel’s will). It is also defined as a “networked brand”, one where four independent collaborating organisations around the (Nobel) hub create and sustain the Nobel Prize’s identity and reputation, acting as a “federated republic”.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Research limitations/implications – The new and combined application of the Heritage Quotient framework and the Corporate Brand Identity<br/><br>
Matrix in the Heritage Brand Identity Process (HBIP) offers a structured approach to integrate the identity of a corporate heritage brand. In a networked situation, understanding the role of stewardship in collaborating organisations is essential: The network entities maintain their own identities and goals, but share common values of the network hub.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Practical implications – The integrated frameworks (HBIP) provides a platform for managing a corporate heritage brand.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Originality/value – This is the first field-based study of the Nobel Prize from a strategic brand management perspective.},
  author       = {Urde, Mats and Greyser, Stephen A},
  issn         = {1061-0421},
  keyword      = {Nobel Prize,Brand stewardship,Corporate brand identity,Corporate heritage brand,Heritage Brand Identity Process,Networked brand},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {318--332},
  publisher    = {Emerald Group Publishing Limited},
  series       = {Journal of Product & Brand Management},
  title        = {The Nobel Prize: the identity of a corporate heritage brand},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JPBM-11-2014-0749},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2015},
}