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Acupuncture relieves pelvic and low-back pain in late pregnancy

Kvorning, N ; Holmberg, C ; Grennert, Lars LU ; Åberg, Anders E LU and Åkeson, Jonas LU (2004) In Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 83(3). p.246-250
Abstract
Background The study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effect and possible adverse effects of acupuncture for pelvic and low-back pain during the last trimester of pregnancy. Methods Following individual informed consent, 72 pregnant women reporting pelvic or low-back pain were randomized during pregnancy weeks 24-37 to an acupuncture group (n = 37) or to a control group (n = 35) at three maternity wards in southern Sweden. Traditional acupuncture points and local tender points (TP) were chosen according to individual pain patterns and stimulated once or twice a week until delivery or complete recovery in acupuncture patients. Control patients were given no sham stimulation. Throughout the study period each patient made weekly visual... (More)
Background The study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effect and possible adverse effects of acupuncture for pelvic and low-back pain during the last trimester of pregnancy. Methods Following individual informed consent, 72 pregnant women reporting pelvic or low-back pain were randomized during pregnancy weeks 24-37 to an acupuncture group (n = 37) or to a control group (n = 35) at three maternity wards in southern Sweden. Traditional acupuncture points and local tender points (TP) were chosen according to individual pain patterns and stimulated once or twice a week until delivery or complete recovery in acupuncture patients. Control patients were given no sham stimulation. Throughout the study period each patient made weekly visual analog scale (VAS) evaluations of maximal and minimal pain intensity as well as three-point assessments of pain intensity during various activities. Results During the study period, VAS scorings of pain intensity decreased over time in 60% of patients in the acupuncture group and in 14% of those in the control group (p < 0.01). At the end of the study period, 43% of the acupuncture patients were less bothered than initially by pain during activity compared with 9% of control patients (p < 0.01). No serious adverse effects of acupuncture were found in the patients, and there were no adverse effects at all in the infants. Conclusion Acupuncture relieves low-back and pelvic pain without serious adverse effects in late pregnancy. (Less)
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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
pain, acupuncture, maternity care, pregnancy, tender points
in
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
volume
83
issue
3
pages
246 - 250
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000189025900004
  • pmid:14995919
  • scopus:1542511874
ISSN
1600-0412
DOI
10.1111/j.0001-6349.2004.0215.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Pediatrics/Urology/Gynecology/Endocrinology (013240400), Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (Mö) (013241110), Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Lund) (013018000)
id
83d9bb86-60c0-45c3-975d-e10eb8bf3a47 (old id 287466)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 16:44:47
date last changed
2020-02-26 05:08:43
@article{83d9bb86-60c0-45c3-975d-e10eb8bf3a47,
  abstract     = {Background The study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effect and possible adverse effects of acupuncture for pelvic and low-back pain during the last trimester of pregnancy. Methods Following individual informed consent, 72 pregnant women reporting pelvic or low-back pain were randomized during pregnancy weeks 24-37 to an acupuncture group (n = 37) or to a control group (n = 35) at three maternity wards in southern Sweden. Traditional acupuncture points and local tender points (TP) were chosen according to individual pain patterns and stimulated once or twice a week until delivery or complete recovery in acupuncture patients. Control patients were given no sham stimulation. Throughout the study period each patient made weekly visual analog scale (VAS) evaluations of maximal and minimal pain intensity as well as three-point assessments of pain intensity during various activities. Results During the study period, VAS scorings of pain intensity decreased over time in 60% of patients in the acupuncture group and in 14% of those in the control group (p &lt; 0.01). At the end of the study period, 43% of the acupuncture patients were less bothered than initially by pain during activity compared with 9% of control patients (p &lt; 0.01). No serious adverse effects of acupuncture were found in the patients, and there were no adverse effects at all in the infants. Conclusion Acupuncture relieves low-back and pelvic pain without serious adverse effects in late pregnancy.},
  author       = {Kvorning, N and Holmberg, C and Grennert, Lars and Åberg, Anders E and Åkeson, Jonas},
  issn         = {1600-0412},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {246--250},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Acupuncture relieves pelvic and low-back pain in late pregnancy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0001-6349.2004.0215.x},
  doi          = {10.1111/j.0001-6349.2004.0215.x},
  volume       = {83},
  year         = {2004},
}