Advanced

The relation between accidents and output in Swedish industry

Lyttkens, Carl Hampus LU (1982) In Safety Science 4(2-4). p.233-242
Abstract
Traditionally, occupational injury rates are measured as number of injuries per amount of work. In contrast, we propose that for certain purposes of economic policy, a more relevant measure could be obtained by considering them as production costs and comparing them with output. This was accomplished by replacing “hours worked” in the traditional formulae for estimating accident risk with “value added”. First, you get a different picture of the development and distribution of accidents and health when using output-related measures. Furthermore, a regression analysis associated a high technological level with a low accident/output ratio. Also, we found that in 1975, there would have been c. 50 % more accidents had the 1975-output been... (More)
Traditionally, occupational injury rates are measured as number of injuries per amount of work. In contrast, we propose that for certain purposes of economic policy, a more relevant measure could be obtained by considering them as production costs and comparing them with output. This was accomplished by replacing “hours worked” in the traditional formulae for estimating accident risk with “value added”. First, you get a different picture of the development and distribution of accidents and health when using output-related measures. Furthermore, a regression analysis associated a high technological level with a low accident/output ratio. Also, we found that in 1975, there would have been c. 50 % more accidents had the 1975-output been produced with 1963-technology and accident risks. Testing the hypothesis that accidents increase relatively during booms, we studied year-to-year changes in production and accidents. Normally, however, accidents increased less than the accident/output ratio indicated. In summary, then, we want to emphasize the importance of relating accidents and other features of the working-place environment to the result of the production process. While in no way denying the possibility of technological progress worsening working-place conditions, we must conclude that our results do not lend support to that hypothesis. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Safety Science
volume
4
issue
2-4
pages
233 - 242
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0020180037
ISSN
0925-7535
DOI
10.1016/0376-6349(82)90031-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
00ad22b2-4f38-4ed6-abf3-e943d1f5fc7e (old id 8410200)
date added to LUP
2015-12-17 15:43:15
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:12:54
@article{00ad22b2-4f38-4ed6-abf3-e943d1f5fc7e,
  abstract     = {Traditionally, occupational injury rates are measured as number of injuries per amount of work. In contrast, we propose that for certain purposes of economic policy, a more relevant measure could be obtained by considering them as production costs and comparing them with output. This was accomplished by replacing “hours worked” in the traditional formulae for estimating accident risk with “value added”. First, you get a different picture of the development and distribution of accidents and health when using output-related measures. Furthermore, a regression analysis associated a high technological level with a low accident/output ratio. Also, we found that in 1975, there would have been c. 50 % more accidents had the 1975-output been produced with 1963-technology and accident risks. Testing the hypothesis that accidents increase relatively during booms, we studied year-to-year changes in production and accidents. Normally, however, accidents increased less than the accident/output ratio indicated. In summary, then, we want to emphasize the importance of relating accidents and other features of the working-place environment to the result of the production process. While in no way denying the possibility of technological progress worsening working-place conditions, we must conclude that our results do not lend support to that hypothesis.},
  author       = {Lyttkens, Carl Hampus},
  issn         = {0925-7535},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2-4},
  pages        = {233--242},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Safety Science},
  title        = {The relation between accidents and output in Swedish industry},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0376-6349(82)90031-1},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {1982},
}