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Calculation models for the transfer of radioactive substances from a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel to the biosphere

Rääf, Christopher LU and Mattsson, Sören LU (2001) In Kunskapsläget på kärnavfallsområdet 2001: rapport 2001(35). p.257-318
Abstract (Swedish)
This chapter summarizes the state of knowledge about models which describe how radioactive substances from a geological repository can be transferred through ecosystems to flora, fauna and mankind. Radionuclide migration to the biosphere and to man primarily occurs via groundwater flows passing through the repository. For such migration to occur, the integrity of the repository barrier system must be breached, for example, due to manufacturing defects in the copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel or as a result of long-term corrosion in the canister or due to other canister defects. The groundwater is connected to various water systems such as wells, ... (More)
This chapter summarizes the state of knowledge about models which describe how radioactive substances from a geological repository can be transferred through ecosystems to flora, fauna and mankind. Radionuclide migration to the biosphere and to man primarily occurs via groundwater flows passing through the repository. For such migration to occur, the integrity of the repository barrier system must be breached, for example, due to manufacturing defects in the copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel or as a result of long-term corrosion in the canister or due to other canister defects. The groundwater is connected to various water systems such as wells, marshes and wetlands, lakes, water courses as well as coastal and sea waters. The groundwater can also contaminate cultivated land via groundwater transport to the cultivation zone and via irrigation. The dilution volumes in the various water systems of the biosphere largely determine the consequences from leakage from a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel in the form of radiation doses to man and animals. Another exposure pathway from a deep repository to man is via bottom sediment in seas and lakes which, after future land rise, may dry up and later be cultivated to produce foodstuffs. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Kunskapsläget på kärnavfallsområdet 2001: rapport
volume
2001
issue
35
pages
61 pages
publisher
Fritzes
ISSN
0375-250X
ISBN
9138214466
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
84537315-ebee-4bdd-a66a-55272fd8f1b4
date added to LUP
2017-08-31 09:52:42
date last changed
2017-08-31 13:03:41
@misc{84537315-ebee-4bdd-a66a-55272fd8f1b4,
  abstract     = {This  chapter  summarizes  the  state  of  knowledge  about  models  which  describe  how  radioactive  substances  from  a  geological repository can be transferred through ecosystems to flora, fauna and  mankind.  Radionuclide  migration  to  the  biosphere  and  to  man primarily occurs via groundwater flows passing through the repository.  For  such  migration  to  occur,  the  integrity  of  the  repository barrier system must be breached, for example, due to manufacturing  defects  in  the  copper  canisters  containing  the  spent  nuclear  fuel  or  as  a  result  of  long-term  corrosion  in  the  canister  or  due  to  other  canister  defects.  The  groundwater  is  connected  to  various  water  systems  such  as  wells,  marshes  and  wetlands,  lakes,  water  courses  as  well  as  coastal  and  sea  waters.  The   groundwater   can   also   contaminate   cultivated   land   via   groundwater transport to the cultivation zone and via irrigation. The   dilution   volumes   in   the   various   water   systems   of   the   biosphere largely determine the consequences from leakage from a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel in the form of radiation doses  to  man  and  animals.  Another  exposure  pathway  from  a  deep repository to man is via bottom sediment in seas and lakes which,  after  future  land  rise,  may  dry  up  and  later  be  cultivated  to produce foodstuffs.},
  author       = {Rääf, Christopher and Mattsson, Sören},
  isbn         = {9138214466},
  issn         = {0375-250X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {35},
  pages        = {257--318},
  publisher    = {Fritzes},
  series       = {Kunskapsläget på kärnavfallsområdet 2001: rapport},
  title        = {Calculation models for the transfer of radioactive substances from a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel to the biosphere},
  volume       = {2001},
  year         = {2001},
}